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Mars is barred: why we shouldn't go to the red planet – Science Weekly podcast
Guardian Science Weekly

Elon Musk believes we should colonise Mars to ensure the survival of the human race. But is this reasoning compelling enough? Hannah Devlin ponders the case against setting our sites on Mars

Science
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A step in the right direction: could implants help people walk again? – Science Weekly podcast
Guardian Science Weekly

Four people with paraplegia were recently implanted with electrodes in their lower backs. They all regained movement below their injuries, and two walked again. This week Nicola Davis investigates this technique – epidural stimulation – and other approaches for treating spinal cord injuries

Science
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The weight is over: will kilograms get an upgrade? – Science Weekly podcast
Guardian Science Weekly

On 16 November, scientists vote on whether to update the way we measure the kilogram. This week, Ian Sample investigates the history of the metric system, and finds out how universal constants might now make it more robust

Science
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Cross section: Mark Miodownik – Science Weekly podcast
Guardian Science Weekly

What can a materials scientist learn from artists? How do you make robotic trousers? And what should we do about plastics? Hannah Devlin sits down with Mark Miodownik to find out

Science
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Opioid addiction: can the UK curb the looming crisis? – Science Weekly podcast
Guardian Science Weekly

The US has been in the grip of an ‘opioid epidemic’ since the 1990s, and now a rise in opioid prescriptions and deaths is being seen across the pond. Ian Sample investigates and asks: what can we do the curb the looming crisis?

Science
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Are fungi the secret to a sweet sounding violin? – Science Weekly podcast
Guardian Science Weekly

From making violins sound beautiful, to beer and bread, to creating life-saving medicine, fungi have an array of very useful attributes. This week, a report demonstrates just how little we know about this kingdom of life and what we are set to gain if we tap into fungi as a resource. Hannah Devlin investigates.

Science
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Could a new force of nature reveal the universe's dark side? – Science Weekly podcast
Guardian Science Weekly

We can see only 4% of the observable universe – the rest is made up of invisible ‘dark matter’ and ‘dark energy’. Now scientists are looking for a postulated force of nature that could open a door to the dark side. Ian Sample investigates

Science
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Conservation: there will (not) be blood - Science Weekly podcast
Guardian Science Weekly

Invasive species have been blamed for wiping out native populations. Conservationists face a hard choice: should they kill one species to save another? The answer is often yes. Nicola Davis explores this dilemma and asks whether there’s a more compassionate approach

Science
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The silver lining in Huntington's disease – Science Weekly podcast
Guardian Science Weekly

This degenerative illness has a few genetic quirks which scientists believe could cause secondary health benefits. Emerging research suggests that people with Huntington’s are less sickly, don’t get cancer as often and even have more brain cells. Hannah Devlin investigates.

Science
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Heatwaves: the next silent killer? - Science Weekly podcast
Guardian Science Weekly

Heatwaves have ravaged much of the northern hemisphere, causing wildfires, destruction and death. Some are blaming heat stress for an increase in chronic kidney disease in Central America. Graihagh Jackson investigates the causes and health effects of heatwaves

Science
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Biomimicry: Does nature do it better? – podcast
Guardian Science Weekly

In this special collaboration between the Guardian’s Science Weekly and Chips with Everything podcasts, we explore why it’s so hard to mimic nature

Science
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Tricky taxonomy: the problems with naming new species – Science Weekly podcast
Guardian Science Weekly

Species are hard to define, as they don’t fit neatly into the categories that science wants to put them into. But increasingly, people are naming new species without enough evidence to suggest they are indeed a separate taxon. Graihagh Jackson investigates why so-called taxonomic vandalism is on the rise and what we can do about it

Science
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In vitro fertilisation: 40 years on – Science Weekly podcast
Guardian Science Weekly

This week, the world’s first IVF baby turned 40. The procedure has come a long way since 1978, and more than 6 million IVF babies have now been born. But should we be concerned about the rising numbers of fertility treatments? And are we becoming less fertile? Hannah Devlin investigates

Science
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The dark side of happiness – Science Weekly podcast
Guardian Science Weekly

Happiness means something different to all of us, be it contentment, pleasure or joy. But could pursuing it leave us sad instead? Nicola Davis explores the science and psychology of happiness

Science
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From Ebola to Nipah: are we ready for the next epidemic? – Science Weekly podcast
Guardian Science Weekly

The 2014 Ebola outbreak killed over 10,000 people before it was eventually brought under control. As new infectious diseases appear around the world, what can we learn from past outbreaks to better prepare ourselves?

Science
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Did dinosaurs stop to smell the flowers? – Science Weekly podcast
Guardian Science Weekly

Is it true that dinosaurs had a role to play in the emergence of flowers? Nicola Davis investigates whether herbivores caused plants to blossom

Science
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Did dinosaurs stop to smell the flowers? – Science Weekly podcast
Guardian Science Weekly

Is it true that dinosaurs had a role to play in the emergence of flowers? Nicola Davis investigates whether herbivores caused plants to blossom

Science
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Slice of PIE: a linguistic common ancestor – Science Weekly podcast
Guardian Science Weekly

Nicola Davis explores Proto-Indo-European, the hypothetical common ancestor of modern Indo-European languages and asks, where did it come from? How and why did it spread? And do languages evolve like genes?

Science
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Gene-edited pigs: can we engineer immunity? – Science Weekly podcast
Guardian Science Weekly

Pigs have been rendered immune to a disease that has cost billions. Hannah Devlin questions whether this could be the future of eliminating debilitating and costly viruses in livestock

Science
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Soundscape ecology with Bernie Krause – Science Weekly podcast
Guardian Science Weekly

Do you know what noise a hungry sea anemone makes? Soundscape ecologist Bernie Krause does. Armed with over 5,000 hours of recordings, he takes Ian Sample on a journey through the natural world and demonstrates why sound is such a powerful tool for conservation

Science
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