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    Three themes from Detroit: Become Human, each focusing on one of the title's main characters, and each scored by a different composer. Detroit: Become Human launches May 25, 2018 on PS4.

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  • I Will Cut You, DevOps & Culture - ITSM weekly the podcast EPISODE 92
    Mindful Cyborgs
    01:12:43
    ITSM
    49,678

    Show Notes and Links: http://www.servicesphere.com/blog/2012/7/9/i-will-cut-you-devops-culture-itsm-weekly-the-podcast-episod.html Show Notes: Amazon Outage Should cloud providers OPEN up to fully disclose their backup systems CNET Article - "Icebergs in the cloud" PDF Link Service Warranty Cloud is a threat to IT Natural Selection isn't pleasant for the non-selected. ServiceNow cloud documentation Are cloud providers by disclosing their ops, for transparency sake, now losing ground with competitive advantage? NIST Cloud Standards Elastic Load Balancing Are we passed the TECH bubble? Best Buy lays off 650 Geek Squad Employees Facebook vs ServiceNow Microsoft / Yammer vs Facebook / Instagram this is a billion dollar battle to be relevant? Salesforce, IBM, Oracle, Microsoft, all racing to be social Perception is a big deal with tech futures, because of Windows 7 $300.00 Windows 8 40.00 licenses costs are changing so fast. MOBILE ONLY SOFTWARE Why HR Still Isn't a Strategic Partner Friction vs Flow John Willis, VP enStratus Devops Movement Cote and John Willis, podcast on ITIL / ITSM with Chris Dancy You own your OWN availability Cloud - Do you need to own a data center? When do standards really work? Devops defined Adam Jacobs – Devops - A professional and cultural movement Kanban Devops is a FAD right now. Damon Edwards, Devop Days Devops = CAMS > Culture, Automation, Measurement and Sharing Tools <> Devops If you can't get the culture right, skip CHEF or PUPPET Velocity Conference 2012- Facebook Session – Jay Parikh - "How do you get to a billion users!" Eliyahu Goldratt "Beyond the Goal" Devops doesn't fit every cultural organization Who is culture hacking? John Allspaw from Etsy Sun Tzu Toyota - You can copy someone’s process, you can't copy someone's culture Culture is BS.... people don't understand the word. Culture is a NICE way of saying "I'm afraid of people" The CULTURE RANT Spike Morelli In reality no one cares about culture, NO ONE. Tools give us a chance to POINT fingers. Culture failures don't give you a opt out on ego. If you are KILLING yourself at work, maybe the suicide rate is a cultural indicator at your organization. No one is exposing the STRENGTHS of cultures. Big data surfing tied to smiley faces and bug bashing Hornbill Software HACK day (Innovation Day) Velocity Conference and Devops Days There is a TALANET WAR right now. BE BOLD, LEAVE YOUR JOB IF THE CULTURE DOESNT WORK How do you lose employees? Why do good employee leave? Is it EVER OK to fire an employee for making a mistake? Good ITIL / Bad ITIL ITIL is about process over people Devops is about people over process Ben Rockwood Velocity ITIL = Constraint / Devops = Flow Continual Service Improvement is NOT a choice; it's a force of nature. Bank Simple - Banking meets culture Introverts and the abuse of the corp culture (TED Talk) Stupid people suck the life out of me Clouderati are just a bunch of talkers Facebook data centers Netflix Culture vs Facebook culture Ian M. Clayton , Paul Wilkinson are now mainstream tigers and koala bears FILDI - F, it, let's do it Build SLACK into workflow Native RT vs Retweet, why it's important A Robot will take your job Show Transcription: ITSM weekly, the podcast for your news, insight analysis and information from the world of IT service management. Your hosts Matthew Hooper, Chris Anthony and Matt Baron. IT Service Management Weekly, the podcast starts now. Welcome to ITSM weekly. The podcast, episode 92. 9 -2. For the week ending, I don't know, we're not good at week. Guys how you doing? Good, how you doing Chris? Good! I'm wearing my V-neck shirt tonight. Okay. It's nice to see neither of you have melted in the heat. Now it's absolutely ridiculously hot out there. We have a guest today, John Willis. How do you pronounce it, is it machoglupa like surround sound. Mr. DevOps. So he should joining us soon. Reach out to him. So let's go ahead and start off with some News and a stupid surprise, baboon brass news. So, any excuse. I got cloud service. just like blowed away. Okay Hoop what do you got for us? Why NewsGator GIO. NewsGator. NewsGator for Hooper. Yes, news. News from the CAO's perspective. Amazon homage. I think this is huge news. Cloud is a problem when you don't have contingency. Cloud is difficult to build contingency because you don't own the asset so what to do. So its got people thinking about it you know how can we do a better job and understanding what's going on behind the cloud front. And it is starting to beg the question, is this time that cloud providers open up and disclose some of their IT systems and how things are put together? Taking a quote from an article on CNet, it says, this strengthens the argument for cloud providers like Amazon to fully disclose their IT systems to either their customers or independent third party for assessment, testing, and inspection. As Yale academic Brian Ford has argued in his academic paper, "Icebergs in the clouds: the other risks of cloud computing" (and I'll put a link to the pdf in the show notes). This pdf is really good actually. It talks a lot about service warranty. And what we need to do to really evaluate a cloud provider's capabilities in providing us the warranty. The basic question here is, "is cloud " - I guess we have talked about it because we view it as a threat to IT, but do things like this help us to view More of a partner. I don't think I've ever seen those as a threat to IT, that would just be my perspective. And I would say that you did. To me, it's a, It is a form of outsourcing right, so I mean there are jobs displaced when you buy a Cloud technology. So, yeah I think it's a complete threat to IT. As we understand IT from 2010, so I agree with Matt Lupa. You know I just see it as part of the evolution of IT, I don't think it's part of a revolution, I don't think that's happening. Come on, Hooper said it was a threat and evolution is a threat, evolution is a threat, it's a threat to people who didn't evolve. Natural selection isn't pleasant for everyone. Oh, okay. Yes, I think I agree I just have a different perspective than maybe the. No, no you have an evolved perspective You have to stop being so smart. What I found interesting about this, I'm getting phone call during the Podcast. might be John Willis. Give it a shot. Shall we pick it up? All right, you guys carry on with the news while I take the call. Whoever it is, let's bring him on the show. Hello? What if it is someone else. It is kind of interesting. We struggled with this with Service Now. For the first three to five years, they didn't publish anything. In fact, you couldn't even tell the way their data centers were. Or dater centers, if I was saying it with a Boston accent. But now they've got some bigger customers and the customers are starting to demand, where are they, what are we going to do when this goes down? It's business-critical service. I think, or at least IT anyway. And so people need to have the fail order plan and they need to understand that if this thing's going to fail, what are your backup options? I need to know what's supporting those three nines or four nines, and give us some real some real capability to not fail if half of the country is off. Part of that though, you're starting to deal with with that level of transparency are they putting themselves at a risk of losing a technical advantage. Definitely. The higher the transparency the easier would be, let's say they chose New York and L.A., then the people in the middle of the country would be going to get posed for bandwidth because you're further distance away, and maybe another provider chooses Minneapolis and the UK. And so then People in those locations are saying, well that makes sense to do that. It's sort of like you need to look at from both a co-location and a cloud service per se but I think the real point of the story, from Amazon's perspective anyway, is that this needs to be a cloud standard that we agree upon and that people can in this has some cloud standards and I'll put a link in the show notes to that. But this situation's different, right, because Amazon's had outages before, and this outage was caused by some of the storms that were coming up the east coast back last Friday. So, you know, they have some outages that were weather driven and whatever. Failure's going to happen. But the problem here is that this is a pretty big outage for them. I mean, it was substantial and lasted hours in duration. It started some time on the 29th of June and carried over to about the first of July for some folks. And a lot of that was, because they didn't understand the relationship between their assets. The root cause, from what they're saying, is it has something to do with what's called the elastic load balance or ELB's. The way that Amazon's architecture is, you have these things called EC2's which virtual serversRDS , which is your database layer. You can put ELBs in between there so things can fail over and they can scale out and you could be on different virtual platforms at any period of time. There was a bug in their software that didn't allow this to fail over correctly, dependencies weren't mapped appropriately. Traditionally in ITA, I think we understand this, we understand what fail over testing is all about. We understand about availability and high availability point of failure risk analysis, is something we understand well. So if we're going to give these services over to a cloud provider, is it okay for me to ask the questions? What is your algorithm for failing over? What is your validation to. But did we ever ask those questions to the people we hired to manage our data centers when we had them internal? I think it was more common. I did. Sometimes they did. Well, you did. You're exceptional. But again, let's not get too hung up the fact that it's a Cloud outage it's still a human error and that human could have been in our office or some place else. Well it's easier to write a check. Is this outage a red herring for not asking for the right types of redundancies, regardless of who you're getting them for. Well it's like Google says, everything fails at scale. Is it possible to test, like how - You're a quote a minute today. What's that? You're a quote a minute today. well you know you can't test for every possible scenario right and so this something that been Amazon and reality is... you know have they rallied around it and repaired it, the question I always ask is better than I could have, had it been me. Yeah. Unless I am a significantly large and just drenched in money organization I'm not not going to be able to have the use forces to. Hm let's think about significantly large, drenched in money, organizations. The elephant in the room. Facebook had gone down because of it. Netflix did! And Netflix is most people's Facebook. I thought people losing their mind because they couldn't use the toaster filter for too well I mean I think do you use a Instragram helper. I have Instragram. do you? Do you use it? i use it to watch my kids. Do you? Alright I've got another phone call coming in, it might be chance. Keep going with the News. So I think some of the bigger news reading well lately as watching the tech markets it could be that we are past the market bubble. Tech stocks are not doing so hot, as you Noticed over the past few weeks, it looks like it could be heading to a continued downturn, or an adjustment, how the "money-folks" call it. I guess it's a wait and see for some of those market trends, but we definitely are on the Downward side of this bubble in my opinion from where we were in the Spring. Best Buy announced today that they're laying off six-hundred and fifty Geek Squad employees. And look at their market presence all together. They've just got issues all around. But what's interesting to me Is service now just went to our ITO obviously I'm focused because that's what I work with everyday. It's interesting because, number one it wasn't very well pronounced. I worked with a lot of people that work with servers all the time and no one even mentioned it really. Steven Mann was actually the only person that I caught that was actually paying attention to the financial aspects of service now. And It's interesting read how people view everything past Facebook now, like every body was saying in the post Facebook IPO world how are tech stocks going to do and how aren't they doing and I think that maybe drove some of the downward trend in the financial market was the Facebook IPO thing. But I don't know, it almost feels like that's going to be our saving grace. That it's going to stop it from getting so big that we all lose our jobs in one fell swoop. Yeah, but you know what, there's a big difference It's in between service now, and Facebook. And the thing is, Facebook didn't really ever have a solid monitization strategy they simply have momento they were just too big to fail right, where service now is proving themselves to to be a viable entity in the enterprise they continue to sell. They have a clear and present sales and marketing strategy B. Right. It's a business. They brought in a whole Yeah, they've brought in a whole new team; it was a natural of what you've seen tech companies do. It's the type of progression you look at most - from start-up to mature operation. They've walked the progression. Right. You know, they've been around for seven, eight years, so this is a completely different circumstance. I think it's doing good. It's still up, right? Thirty or forty percent from there. Yes, but do you think that Facebook is going to save us from another DotCom burst because of this downward trend now? The tech markets that I'm talking about in particular are your IBMs, your Microsofts, your Oracles, I mean everything's down right now. It's down percentage wise it's anything from four and a half to, you know, twelve percent, I mean, it's pretty significant dips from the highs of four months ago, so, you know those are your kind of latest options look at it as a benchmark right for or more enterprise technology service now coming out at this point is good for them, I think, are different, uh they're and what people who own stocks in those enterprise platforms want to reinvest in something similar to a space that they know. This is a good place for them to find their money. You know, So I think from a Facebook perspective, overall this probably is a consumer side of tech bubble that will that will continue to reset itself from a market standpoint, but I think that's probably ineffective and not so much the start price of Facebook, I really think it's going the position prices, the Instagram purchases, the Yammer purchases, the Skype purchases that we've been seeing, There was a day when you didn't pay over a hundred million dollars for software companies, and now the price is a billion dollars? Yeah. And, I think that's a bit unrealistic, you know, was Instagram really worth a billion dollars? II can't see anybody justifying that that's the case, and when Facebook took the 10% or more tumble, or what is it now twenty-five percent tumble. I think they've lost more. They've lost value. They paid 1% of their cap for Instagram. I don't get it. I get it- they paid one percent of their cap to be relevant. They paid the same amount that Microsoft did for Yammer. We talked about this last time. I don't think anyone realizes how crazy relevance and how expensive it has become. Yeah. I think Yammer It was a better purchase than Instagram though. It depends about what they do with the Empire. Well, yeah. I mean someone's saying, are they going to make it Microsoft Sharepoint mobile social platform. You have to step back though and realize that these are completely sell jobs from the lawyers, the brokers, and all the people who really make conditions on these huge transactions. Because if Microsoft didn't buy Yammer, you gonna tell me that they're gonna be more relevant in six months now because they bought Yammer without buying Yammer? They're not. In a year and a half from now. Say that one more time? In six months from now, Microsoft would not be anymore relevant with not any relevant with Yammer then without Yammer. And in a year and a half they could have paid less for Yammer because by then their would have been 15 other Yammer competitors out there. So, the reality is, it wasn't a transaction of necessity, it was a transaction of fear. Male 1: pressure and timing. Male 2 :Well, all transactions, are transactions of fear. Male 1:Sure. Male2: You buy a house because you're afraid your family is gonna think you're not as mature as you said you were now that it has been two years after the marriage. No one actually buys anything out of shire shrewd planning. That's a type of thinking that doesn't exist in humanity any longer. I do think it was a brilliant purchase for the sheer perception of, Hey we care. I think if it was a me too purchase. Again, we have talked about this on the show a hundred times before, maybe, i feel like we have because I pay attention. But, you know, Oracle pivoted social enterprise, Salesforce pivoted social enterprise. Biggest social software author, IBM. There's not an organization on the planet. ServiceNow has Live Feed. Everybody is racing towards how do we get people to collaborate? Now that people are just collaborating differently. if you put point is and maybe it's because I'm out taking phone calls trying to get John Willis on the show live. If your point is, did it actually do anything real for them? You know, perception is a big deal, I mean Microsoft in my opinion has to really look at a scary future of their licensing remuneration, of their original how they license stuff. They just dropped Windows 8 from the $300 I paid for Windows 7, to $40. Yes, isn't that insane? So, again, I think if you're in IT, if you're in service management, you should be watching these purchases, you should be watching these decisions, you should be saying to yourself: I am in a position to lead my organization toward better decisions because I understand how the cloud outage affected it. I understand, from listening to this podcast, types of information I should be bringing to my organization. I understand from watching Microsoft buy these technologies, from watching Facebook buying these technologies, I should be focused on mobile only. go back to the podcast two years ago, mobile only. Right? Again, but are people doing it? We are in a race against time. And I would say it used to be all about vanity. It was all about saving and looking important. You're now in a race to be relevant so you can feed yourself. Yeah. Right. Right. Well you know, this is a continual change of attitude, right? From where we were and IT even five years ago. It goes well to the tweet that I saw from Shane Carlson. Say a guest first saw this too about HR. Yeah. It's not just IT that doesn't plan itself not to be a strategic partner with the business. The article was pretty funny, I mean I read it and I said you could completely put HR and just take out HR and put IT here, and I think this a common feeling amongst most IT measures. I'll read from the article for just a real quick second. It says that every action you take as a, I'll put what it really says here, HR every action you take as an HR leader, ask a simple question, does it cause friction in the business or does it create flow. Friction is anything that makes it more difficult people in critical roles to win with the customer. Flow on the other hand is doing everything possible to remove barriers to promote better performance. The question applies to virtually any company and any business that will take you farther down the road faster than the hazy, abstract injunction to become a strategic partner. Even in what appeared to In routine HR responsibilities you can inject the business prospectus simply by asking, whether what you are doing is going enhance the flow of the business, or impede it with friction. why is it so difficult to inject the business prospective because HR leaders we feel ourselves to be near the pimple of the organization the organization reports to us it must meet on to for information, documents, and numbers. Boy, I thought IT had a problem. But, I think this is common feeling inside of IT. They want data, they want information, they're going to have to come to us. We're gonna put in command and control to make sure things are protected and things are governed and a lot of the times it's more friction than it is flow, right? Yeah. Look at any ERP system ever. It's always friction, that ain't flow. Speaking of friction and flow, what a way to introduce someone. I'm an idiot, I admit it. Oh, no, you're DevOps, we have you on because you're agile. Welcome, twenty minutes into the show. Yeah. You missed the scumm meeting, I hope you got everything done from yesterday. Yeah, right. Well, I was in the thing and I thought I was on and I was yelling because I was listening to your conversation about the people yell out. Can I go back on one point that you guys were making about the outage now that I'm here? Well can we introduce you? Sure, that'd be good. Why don't you introduce yourself, because you're a much heralded major player in the world of IT and everything that's happening now. Well, thank you I just went from idiot to like miracle worker, so, my name is John Willis, I'm the VP you have customer service enabling. We have the company called Enstratus. I've been doing IT for thirty years, I probably more recently have been heavily involved in this DevOps movement really rocked right from the ground floor. I consider myself kind of part of the tribe that promotes DevOps for all the right reasons and that's about it. We'll talk about all the right reasons in a minute. Welcome. Is this your first live to YouTube hangout? It is, as you can obviously tell, that's right. So, I I'm a big fan. You and Kote had me on your show about two years ago and this show wouldn't exist without you two. So, in some ways you birthed me, how does that make you feel? That's great, that's great. Actually there's a few out there Bert, there's the chef food fight guys they give me credit for sparking them to start their excellent chef podcast as well. Yeah, and congratulations on the weight loss, by the way. Oh, thank you very much, thank you very much. Talk to us a little about your view on the outage because I think some of it should be good. The point I want to make is I do wanna talk about data loss but it's all interrelated. Ben Black says, "You own your own availability." And so one of the things that I think that the cloud has pushed on us is that there is some magic secret syrup here, where you don't have to rethink. You know, what the Klout is, it lose the barrier to entry owning a data center. At the end of the day, you still have a business and you still have a data center. and so it gets tricky at the high end because a lot of things you give up. But, I heard someone in that conversation talking about did we do this before in data centres the good ones did. The good ones had, unfortunately it was a lot more expensive, a lot more complicated but they built high availability DR infrastructures. Some of them had mirrored hidden data centers. Some of them just brought a bunch of tapes over to another building which never worked. But at the end of the day end of the day, the misnomer or the fallacy of Cloud is that you don't need that stuff anymore, and again, take Cloud for what it's good at which is a familiar infrastructure, easy to get, you don't have to rack and stack but the people who think they're getting a cloud at a bargain basement price I used to stop thinking abut how to run the business and make your business; you know the good ones I haven't read the Netflix review yet, but you know the past major outages, you know, the good ones know how to go around this and you know because we spent a lot of money on people. Let's figure out how to get around this. And I see that was my point to Hooper was it doesn't matter where my servers are, it's the people who I hired. Exactly. Yes, questions you ask and you time you really focus on what matters. But where in the NIST standard does it say that the people you hired this way. Oh, that's Idol page, you know, not so much; yeah, yeah. No, that's in the HR article, isn't it? And that other point about like the I'm not a big I mean I love standards, but when do they really, really, really, really, really work? And I think NIST has set some great foundational stuff, but this idea that we're going to get out of this battle, this thing that's moving so fast and so crazy, that the idea of people are just staying around trying to put Dander's on you know, how many colons should go here. How many commas after this phrase. The world has to be very adaptive right now you can do more with something like chess. Did your house tilt in an earth quake John, cause you look crooked. Oh yeah I am kind of I've never watched it - a lot of live videos. I've watched John before and he tells us when he thinks, he's really really really left brained. You've got to get the blood flowing. That's right, it's a new exercise technique. Last week we did a dramatic reading where I read, Did you notice Gross put in dramatic reading music. I listen to the show. Yeah, of course you don't . You don't even run a company, as far as I'm concerned. So I see has become and idiot and brilliant in the same sentence. So we did a dramatic reading of the Wikipedia article DevOps. So I would like a John dramatic interpretation of DevOps. Yeah, you know, I think the simplest starting point is, I've always said it was Adam Jacobs. DevOps is a professional and cultural movement, period. But I think David J. Anderson who's one of the KanBan Frontier guys. I read something of his where he talks more about it being a philosophy. And I think when we look back at the old lean stuff, we see that they talk more about it being a philosophy than anything else. But beyond that and those are cheap definitions but the reason I always like this post to start for them first is it's like anything that has this danger being a fad, which DevOps is definitely a fad right now. And that's a good thing, bad thing. Yeah. But you want to always be able to draw back to some kind of a solid ground, you know? Which is, really let's not forget the cultural aspect of DevOps. It has a lot to do with why this movement is so great. Then the vendors try to take over, and you know, that's just a game. They are. I mean, I've seen vendors with complete marketing programs around 'they enable DevOps'. Of course they do. Yeah. You 're going to see expert speakers show up from all these vendors. I can see then now. Yeah. They do that with Cloud, too. They did that with Cloud and they're still doing it with Cloud. I tell the story, it's just like the stars. They spend their whole life trying to get on camera and getting pictures taken of them and the minute they become famous they start complaining about everybody taking picture of them. Well, if you're in a movement and you're pushing really hard for adoption -- you know, Damon Edwards says you can't complain about who adopts you, you know? That's why I'm all for foster parenting. Yeah, you are. That's right. So, to me I think that one of the things that's probably not in that Wikipedia article, I haven't looked at in a while but me and Damon Edwards a few years ago started this idea, it was after the first DevOps days in the U.S. They had run a couple in Europe and we kinda helped through Velocity and through Damon and myself and a bunch of other people. Tried to get the first days out in Mountainview and it was amazing to see like 300 people show up on a dime and all these people be unbelievably passionate about. One of the things I love about DevOps is you can criticize or not, but most people when I explain it to them, you explain it very simply and it will represent complex ideas and nine or ten will get it from the first explanation you know and it was three hundred people that showed up it kind of got on the first explanation. And after that we did a podcast and we tried to just sift through all the craziness that happened, the the kind of birth of DevOps in our mind and we came out with this acronym called CAMS, culture, automation, measurement and sharing and we just tried to put not to really try to change the world or say hey this is - I like that. So could you break it down for us, culture, automation - Yeah, so culture If you don't get this magic that is DevOps, which I'm drinking the Kool-aid obviously, but none of it works. You are braking few walls in a giant red suit. That's it, but none of it works unless you know... if you nail the behavior patterns that make it work. So you know and some of it is magic, some it is actually black magic but some of it is just you know, there are people like you look at a guy like John Osvar everywhere he goes. He works at Etsy now, he was at Flicker. Where he goes, culture follows. And so culture The misnomer about, the things I don't like about DevOps are the people who say, put in this tool in your DevOps. Now anybody who knows what - That sounds a lot like ITIL. I've heard this before. Well, it is. Well, I do actually wanna talk about iTunes and Hold that thought, before you guys explode and blow up here I'm gonna look for you guys, I wanna give you a couple of my theories, and and you guys either break then down or tell me I'm back to being an idiot and throw me off the show. We don't want to split hairs. There you go. now that's tooling for you. I know how to work a tool. There you go, it's all about the tools. That's the problem with DevOps is there's alot of this Like we're kind of not worrying about, so anyway, cams, I would say if you can't get the culture right, then don't bother putting anything in shaft or puppet, you know that stuff. I mean, I know you guys know this, but, unfortunately, right now in the Devops movement we are very tools-heavy on the conversation. In fact ways it's a fear of mine that DevOps might just become another fad. You know, where our correct gravity is, way too much towards the tools. The companies that have been successful, the poster child's for DevOp commerce will tell you first. it was all about their culture. You know it's all fun and games until you see a headline that reads: DevOps as a service. Right, there you go right? And you know it's at Velocity, I was at Velocity and one of the keynotes was done by Facebook. You can hate Facebook or love Facebook it doesn't matter to me but Facebook's presentation was... the title of the presentation was a question. How do you get to a billion users? And the whole presentation was about their culture and how they and focus on a culture, how they train managers. You know, it's every part of the DNA. And you know what, the Twit stream, was extremely negative. about their presentation, like as if it was one big old job posting or why didn't you talk about the cool technology? And this is velocity, where are you guys supposed to get it? Web operations. Velocity's twitter stream was blowing up, the fact that Facebook came to talk about it, but again if you've got a presentation like the one you're describing. You've got a bunch of people who supposedly espouse cultural change then being negative about it. Did you every really understand the word culture to begin with. I think i've become a big fan of Elliot Goldratt, the original Gold. Yeah we had him on last week. Oh there you go yeah well that's pretty magical cause he's been dead for about a year I think. That's why I said nobody. You guys are awesome man. I try Hey when I die can you bring me back John? Hold hands, we'll light some candles. We'll do the John Willis, two puck for Yeah. I think I'll be really smart once I'm fed. I think I'll come up with then for sure. You want to stick to the point though? You said culture 'cause the reality is that DevOps every cultural organization. I don't want it. Yeah and isn't that why DevOps be successful because out of the gate you're saying this isn't going to work for everybody, so we're going to make it a little bit more prescriptive for the people who are, right? Yeah, I And somebody said to me the other day, and I want to fight this from my core, but you can't ever work unless you it needs for different leadership. And unfortunately, you know, there's just a lot of bad leadership out there. And I gotta believe there are half There are small examples of hacks that work. But you're right, I mean the problem with - I did this gig with a large telco about a year ago and there was a DevOps workshop and their culture is so static. They got ELA's with large vendors that you have to get fourth level approval to get any other product that is a part of the single vent to ELA, right? John, who are you watching that you think is really a espousing, if I can just coin a term that probably has been used. Who's culture hacking? It's actually not enough people. There are people that are very focused on the culture of their business, but there aren't a lot like if you look at somebody like John Allspaw from Etsy. He's a poster child for doing things right. don't show up at presentations and what not, but the truth is lot of people don't--just like the velocity crowd--they don't want to hear the soft stuff. They want to hear, because Etsy is also doing phenomenal stuff with tools. Yeah. And the noise level, even though, again, I'm not accusing them of this, but the noise level of what you'll hear at Etsy is more about tools. And here's the point I want to make about Eliyahu Goldratt. Eliyahu Goldratt has a book called "Beyond the Goal" and he talks about why MRP failed, why ERP failed, why ecommerce failed, and what happens is, the early adapters - That sounds like a thrilling book. Yeah, well it's "Beyond the Goal", but he ties it to the theory of constraints. But more importantly, he says that the early companies get involved in this stuff for reasons pretty much not seen by all the people who copied it. Right. Right, and what you wind it up seeing and I'm watching this in DevOps now, you're looking at the earlier companies that got it all right on their culture. And then people are coupling basically their tool sets. And I think, there's a great quote from the father of Toyota production systems, Ohno Tiachi he says that, you know they asked him, "Aren't you afraid of bringing in American companies and looking at your process and all that?" And he said, "You know what they can copy our process but they can't copy our culture." And I think my fear is that DevOps, we're not focusing on enough on the culture hacking. And I try to because as more and more people move away from Why don't you start tweeting, everything would just a pound sign culture hack. Okay that sounds cool. Dex, you know, one IT fails is great but let's focus on a culture hack, because I've got to be honest with you John, I've only been on this show, I was on a show with you and Kote once this trippy thing for three years now with these two clowns. Which he threw under the bus when he was on your show, John. I remember the show. I am so sick it was a damn good show, I am so sick and tired of people saying culture! culture! culture! to me it's a red state/blue state Red herring, for I don't understand. I can't even swear, because we are live. But I don't understand crap, right? So I am going to use, the word culture is more buzzy. in fatish then DevOps Culture to me is a nice way of saying I'm afraid of people, and I won't want to get over being afraid of people. And be honest and open with where I am in not only my own development, but the development of the organization, the development of my industry and the development of the humans and touch everyday. But you can't. Because you're afraid if you actually were out there and you say "we suck at this", someones gonna step on you and you're gonna lose your job, and you've got a family to So I think, if Culture & DevOps and corporate hacking want to get real and get fierce, we need to be ready to say, "If you stand up, we'll help you get another job". Of course. Because hacking means disruption. I agree. I totally, and you know, I hadn't even thought of this, it's funny but there's this guy Spike Morelli and he's kind of big in DevOps in Europe. Before we did the open spaces at the DevOps days and he wanted to prove a point I actually disagreed with him and he proved me wrong. He said that we should stop using, you know, C and cams because nobody cares about the culture, and I'm like, naw, that's not true Spike. And he said, watch this. So he proposed an open spaces on culture and out of, for the two days there were probably 50 sessions proposed and probably 47 of them were tools days, 3 of them were culture. And in fact, He said that there was a big DevOps presentation. I think this is directly, that you can, it's easy. Most of these people are men, and men are obsessed with tools. I mean let's just look at this at a biological level. But again, if you go back and you start piercing, you look at these companies that are successful They get it, and everybody else is trying to copy the wrong things. What my experience has been is that people with tools for IT folks. It's very easy. Because if it fails, you work within the constraints of the tool. It's the vendor's fault. But if it's culture, the only way that we know how to change culture in IT is to change policy. Mandate. That is not how you change culture. That's right. You can look at some of the I could show you a hundred different presentations from the last 30 ITSM conferences I've been at, and I can point to where it says, policy, procedure the process, work instructions, this is how we change our culture and every time I go, "Oh my god that's completely not how you change your culture." Well, you know how that works. That works at FoxCon. And you know what the FoxCon culture does to people? It kills them. They kill themselves. Yeah, it works in Auschwitz. Right? If you're killing yourself at work, if you're jumping out of those because you've got so much process to put together for the next iPad, maybe the suicide rate is a cultural indicator at this company. Yeah, I mean if you look at the places that are getting it right, and again, Facebook says it right out blatant: "There's no other way to get to a billion users than managing culture." They just can't do it. I mean, that was their, you know, their presentation and I spoke to the guy that runs operations late at the bar. And he was saying like, "We got some pushback on our presentation." You've got to be kidding me? It was a beautiful story. So, the problem is, the guys that, back to your original question, Chris, like how do you do it, who are talking about it. There's nobody exposing the strength of it. If you look at, like, what the Facebook has done, or you look at what Etsy is doing, there's a handful of really interesting companies that are building a lot of types of things in their company, and I think it starts with people having fun, having smiles on their face. There's a guy, there's a guy that did this thing where every day he made all the people, and this may sound silly but wait until you listen to the end of it. At the end of the day he made everybody put, he called it the smiley board face. At the end of the day he made everybody write one of three faces: a smiley face, a blase face, or an angry face. And at the end of every sprint they actually brought it up in the retrospective and tried to correlate some of the bugs. There are companies that run hack days right, this is famous at places like Facebook, where they build into the time, this idea that, some companies as aggressive as every Friday One of our - we have a show in Europe and a show in Australia - but one of the podcast members over in Europe As Patrick Boulder from Hornville. Do you know what they did the other day? You would love this. So, they decided to have an innovation day, kind of like you' re describing. Right. But they broadcast it on all the Social channels so their customers could chime in. Yeah. Not only had an innovation day internally, they made it exposed. So, go to their Google page. I thought to myself that's pretty dangerous. It's transparent, it speaks for the culture. I don't know. There was a company One of the companies I was talking to over the last week, you know last week was pretty much the Mecca for guys that are dev ops. You've got Velocity, and then You have DevOps days for all the people from Logic Motors. One guy was saying that they do their stand-ups, they invite their customers to the stand-ups. That do about being bold. But the point I wanted to make about the having fun is I mean one of the mantras now in DevOps community is if you don't work for a company where you're not having fun and you're not learning stuff, you're not doing something? I don't know if anybody's aware of this, there's like a war for resources right now. Right. Yeah. I mean a war. That 's a lot of talent. There's an all out war for talent. Yeah. And I think that's where people need to be a little bit more brave about being bold at where they work. I'm constantly reminded about allocating my time and fitting into this mold, but I will constantly do what I need to do to have fun. Yeah . So if you're part of that pool which most people who would listen to this show or listen to anything I would have to say would be part of that pool. If you're not having fun, you know, and management. That's another thing why I think in someways this has to succeed because people will lose there employees because they're not doing new technologies and fun stuff. They'll also lose places when they go and hear the attitude of some of these people that are running what I call a DevOps shop, but the model of a DevOps environment. Wow, that sounds like a great place to work. I had this thing with John Aspaugh, this was a great session that we had. Basically, it was an open space session, and it says "Is it ever okay to fire an employee for making a mistake?". And it was a heavy DevOps crowd, so the answer basically across the board, there was maybe one or two people who basically said, it's a horrible say blah blah blah blah blah if it's a banker. If no ones dead there's no mistake that horrible. So then I ask the question. And the obvious reason for not doing that is you don't want to set a tone of the culture. Where you don't want your people to experiment and try things and be bold. The first time someone tries. You tell your boys, "Be Bold." Be bold, be bold. Then you try something and you're fired. So then I asked the question, what about the second time they make the same mistake? Do you fire him then? No. And the answer was no. Now I asked, okay, what about the third time for the same mistake? And his answer was no And I was like, okay, gotta put the T time, C sign up, John, You know, we're. But there's the thing, we kinda ended the session with this, agree to disagree which is weird, because I never disagree with this guy. You know what I mean? Almost everything he talks about is. So is this relief that you just ever fire somebody that they just continually make the same mistake over and over again. Well, here's the point. In the hallway, I went up to him, and I'm like, "John, this is bugging the hell out of me." And that point, I had half the room on my side, right, and not that I was trying to win an argument, but at one point I said, "Am I the only one - When you're keeping track of the room, you're trying to win an argument. Yeah, yeah, that's true. That's true. Okay, so, but anyway so I won half the room. Just take it from someone who constantly tries to win arguments. Okay fair enough. Fair enough but so then I grabbed him in the hallway and then he gave me the example, and this is how core these guys think in culture. He said, "Here's the thing I was trying to explain and we really couldn't get it." You know how in open spaces, everybody's kind of interrupting, and that's just the nature of the beast. But he said, "Here's the thing. In my world, the way this works is somebody makes a mistake, they go out and they figure out what the mistake was. In a retrospective, they go ahead, and they basically explain their mistake to the whole team. And then the team decides how to fix it." And then, if it happens again, so what his point was then they go through that same process and the team decides. So the team says, "Okay. The answer is we didn't do this right so we need to do this and this." And then it turns out the next time that outside. So even when you get to third time, his point was, it's always the team's responsibility. That's beautiful. Now, I don't know how far you can take that, but that is a protection mechanism of culture over anything else. Right? There is a hyper protection measure over culture, over anything else. Right. Because you know in your success that that is the culture that protecting this behavior pattern, or the culture of being bold and be brave will be protected almost any, in almost any scenario. Well, I have a lot of people who question my motives behind a lot of the things that I do. I think Hooper and Beran know me better than anyone on even though they don't spend a lot of time with me. But the culture you're describing there is very similar to what I think we all do, right? So I work inside with my team at my company.then work within side my company but I focused a lot of my time focusing on my net work. Alright. So I work for more for than just my current company, I work for my net work. I think to protect that culture that you're talking about it goes back to this idea of king making. I have to always enable everyone around me, no matter how many mistakes I made to be bigger and better than themselves. 'Cause ultimately, I can't defend myself. But the people around me can. Right. Right? So, if I actually am altruistic enough to leverage the people I trust with my reputation. I never have to worry about making a mistake again. It's all about growing and learning. And if people on your team are growing and learning through mistakes, then you're growing and learning. That's the definition of culture. Yeah. You're one big organism. Look back to tribes. Speaking of one big, unnatural organism. Hold on tribe-head. We gotta get to his comments on ITIL. Yeah, there we go. Stevie Chambers just having a melt down. All right. We're a live show, we try to watch it all, we've got boards over so when you have got time every body serious with you they calm down but so here let me say this for but let me get both of these out because this first one might you know then i will get caught up on that because i want to say this good message bad message ITIL. Nothing really bad. All right, so I want to say I'm both, and then let's discuss it, if that's fair. So the thing I always say I think that. And I've got some ITIL tops. Not as recent, but back in the day. Back in the early days, you know, I worked for problem management. vendor, problem change. I worked a lot with IBM, when they were originally pushing, back when they actually used have vendors certified, which is kind of silly in the space a little bit. So what I say in the DevOps thing, I think is that ITIL is about putting process over people and DevOps is basically about putting people over a process. So when you hit a fork in the road at DevOps, it's always gonna be kind of the people or the culture of the things that work. And the beauty of ITIL was, in my opinion, was that there was a world that had no clue of what it was doing. And then we could argue whether they still do our not, but what ITIL brought to this world was, not perfection, but at least a template for the way that things could be done. But that's the negative point, if that's negative. The positive point is that I personally believe, and I think Ben Rockwood, if you don't follow him, is a firm believer of this. I think that there is a world where ITIL and DevOps will work beautiful. and it's kind of like again if you guys don't follow TOC but you know there's examples of theory. I think Hooper does TOC stuff. Yeah. I taught TOC Troy Dumoulin. There's a good book, it's called Velocity. It's combining Lean Six Sigma and theory of constraints. And the story is basically companies been running a theory constraints and TOC for years. I mean Lean Six Sigma guys come in and rake everything up, smack everything around and the whole thing turns into a mess and the end story is that what they should have done is still filed to your constraint and apply Lean Six Sigma on top of the bottlenecks and, you know, and then focused in on bottlenecks and then went ahead and then applied the institute. And so I think what we're going to find is this, you're going to be a really nice marriage if we figure out that story. But how to apply, we already see examples of it in some ways. But I think thatare correct. The question is going to be figuring out how do they both live, where they're kind of, by my definition, in conflict. Well, I think I want Hooper to answer that 'cause he teaches and he's actually gonna start up and I think that would be very interesting. Beran definitely. But they're in conflict, I believe. Because one begot the other. You couldn't have people over process if you didn't have something that was process over people. To me it's the same thing as just what we talked about from that HR article, right? ITIL to me is about constraint. DevOps to me is about flow. Right. So ITIL is about protection and about preservation, and where DevOps is about action and innovation. Right. So they're coming about it from a different outcome. And that's what I said earlier I think culturally recognizing that DevOps is not for everybody. Listen, do I want DevOps for my bank? Do I want DevOps for the airplane shop for programmers? I don't know that I do. But do I want it for my startup? Absolutely. Do I want it for my social media company and do I want it for my consumer software? Absolutely. I think it just comes down to certain aspects of how fast you want to move, and what levels of risk, and what kind of culture you are building. Do you see first the whole idea of continuous service improving 'cause you can't focus on a constraint and fix it without another one arising. So again, I think if we just, I mean John raised a very straightforward question. How do they exist? What does it look like together in the future? I truly believe that that's, you know, trying to figure out what that looks like it probably is a nice way to spend time that I don't have, when I could just say that they're going to exist, because they can't exist without each other now. You can't have those three people from Crypton who got banished by Jor-El's father there. The big, tall, goofy guy would have been a bad movie. on his own. The Chick with The Bad Attitude would have been a horrific movie on her own, and Zod by himself is just stupid. Right? So what does that movie look like with them all three together? I think building toward a future where they just coexist, not trying to figure out what it looks like or who controls it. I mean worrying about what things are, to me, is almost as bad as worrying about what tools make them happen. We almost need a new movement where it's the theory of acceptance. I'm breathing, and everything will be okay. Well that's the thing, again going back to being a Goldratt nut right now is that all his discussions are about these conflicts that get figured out. You know, there's, you know he talks a lot about They don't have a choice, continual service improvement is not choice. It's a force of nature. That's right. That's right. Now one thing I did want to say is that, I do think, I honestly, I'm so in the Kool-Aid that I do think that fighter pilots and planes and banks and all that. I think that we're gonna find is that when we get people to work in a culture that we're going to find that we make less mistakes. We're going to find that we get more productivity. Personally I'm not rejecting your opinion. But I don't personally accept that. I'm not saying we've figured it out, anywhere as near. But if we can figure it out, and learn how to transform what these companies like Etsy and Facebook are doing to banks that I think we will find higher productivity and quality. I completely I think I agree with you to meet transforming banks to act and Hooper's back to the points about banks and aeroplanes and you want them to have that maturity. You want them to focus on these types of decision making. You don't want them to focus on being innovative. Well, I want them to focus on risk and I want them to focus on constraint. You know, I want the productivity levels high. And to me, I was listening to him say, John, and I was thinking to myself, "That's interesting. Well, what happens if I'd rather fly on a less safe plane that's more exciting, than on a really terribly boring plane that's slower." Which it would be? What happens if I don't value my current state and I've traded all of my worldly possessions into a way of living and sustaining myself that I really don't care if the bank Well on a more dangerous airplane, maybe you actually get into outer space on. Well, but again, I don't even, I mean, there are, like, a good example is this Bank Simple, right? Which is out in Portland right now. As we're waiting, we talked about that on the podcast a few months ago. Yeah. That thing is radically different. Right, but I'm not even saying that. I'm just saying, I'm not a scientist. I'm just saying, I bet you we will find out that we will get better quality, better control, and better productivity by allowing people to do more freedom to work in environments where they're not interrupted. To work in environments where they're allowed to actually explore their ideas and so in that, and again, I'm not saying and we've got that nutted in DevOps by any means. I'm just saying if we can figure out the patterns that induce that. I think we have figured out the patterns. Again, you know, we like to forget the history very quickly. But there's an interesting TED talk on introverts right now that people told me about over the last few months. And the idea is over the last hundred years, that we've gone from an agricultural society into an industrial society. We force people into cities, which then force people into offices, and now we're forcing people into the open offices. Where we've taken at least 40% of the culture who are natural introverts and made them work in this groupthink, right? Right. And they're not used to functioning like that. Most innovation comes from solitary work. There's a reason I prefer to work at home. It's not 'cause I can't get anything done at work. I can't. We all know that I can't get anything done at work. But, I am affected by people's physical energy of stupidity. I can't be around other people emanating stupidity, it literally sucks the life out of me. That's why he dreams up the contest. That's why he has a Ph.D. cleaning his house. She's actually a masters in Physiology but she cleans his house just your energy your vibe of the smartness. And I hate the fact my house cleaner's from behind me while we're doing this. But John, I mean, to your point, how do we get those back? How do we get these things back? We need to respect the fact that some people. There's a doctor right there. need not to be working like we're working. Right. You know some people, introverts, we don't treat very well anymore and you know this Ted Talk made a brilliant point that, just because you're the most charismatic person, you've got everyone's attention, doesn't mean you're probably the brightest. Yeah, no, that's great. I mean I totally see what you're saying. I don't know how to put that in my brain now. I'm sorry. I'm around smart people now. So you're elevating me. I'm got some of your energy. Well, the conversation is awesome, so that's, but what I, now I'm gonna like when do you write me back? I'm starting to worry about when you're going to kick me off the show now. So, having so much fun. So, no, the thing about Insular it's interesting because I mean there's a certain point I need to look at a tad 'cause there's a certain point you're right. We've got a lot of talkers. You know, I love my Clouterati, but they are some bunch of talkers, right? You know, I mean there's some of them that are dear friends of mine But I saw somewhere the other day where somebody asked a question that was just a fundamental thing you would know if you'd ever used Amazon. It was one of the Clouderattis that didn't know it. And so that is a fear of ours, becoming such social nuts that like the real smart people the people actually like me really that can talk a good game. But we need the people like you, who can talk a good game, because the people who actually know the game are too busy focusing on their body, all right? We need, you know, I don't know. You would think I would know, but I think Hooper is kind of a smart introvert who just happens to dance on the I want to get wild extrovert side. Beran, obviously extroverted, doesn't know a grass skirt from high heels. Wouldn 't take him to a dance, but gosh he's fun to hang out and cheat on my wife with. He's the perfect mistress. When it comes right When it comes right down to it, you know, again we need to be respectful then wreck this whole culture BS that. It's not BS but we need just to be respectful that certain things will work themselves out. We've made drastically horrific mistakes in managing people and how we put them together. And oh, we'll remove the cubes and that will fix all the problems. Well actually no, it made 40% of the people more uncomfortable, and they now can't function. Right? So you know, we could, we could do this for another two hours. It's been amazing, I'd love to have you back on. If you'd be willing. Probably one of the more probably shows. Yeah, I know. I can talk about this. I've been trying to figure out. Chris, I do think, I You know, I know you don't like this wag kinda title but I think it is culture over everything else and the companies that I'm watching become nominally successful for starting this set. I think the plumbing. And what I'm hoping is people don't miss the fundamentals of their plumbing. We can make fun of Facebook all day long, but the way they're building data centers now, and the way their people are, you know they built a data center in 12 months, and then they turn around almost double in size, one in ten months you know and they're all appointed at this presentation was. This is not a fool's problem. This is building a culture where people can move fast, adapt, learn how to work with people. I mean Netflix is a little more militant about their culture, but at least they talk about it up front. They say, "If you're not this kind of person and you're not gonna adapt this, this, and this "Do not come work here." And by the way, if you do and you think you're that kind of person you're not, we are probably going to fire you. And I'm not crazy about that, but it works for them. Because, what they wind up having is people that people that stay there. People just really love this, you know, competitive, being the best of the best. So let's end today's show with each of you give me a cultural hack. So give me a line or two. Wait. Can we ask John where he got that awesome Carlos Santana picture? No. Stevie Ray Vaughn, dude. Aw, my man! Stevie Ray Vaughn yeah. Have you guys ever seen John play? No I never see him play. But if he sounds like SRV, I'm tuning in. I'm the only person alive today that pays attention. Guys, we had this jam at Dev Ops Days. I mean, like if we could do one of your service conferences. We can't have Jan at a service management conference. Oh come on, now. Oh please, these people are too busy looking up things in books. Well it's a lot of recipe books in between songs. It took 12 years to get Ian Clayton to be normal, it took him 10 years to get Paul Wilkinson to be acceptable. Oh. It'll take us. I mean, we are so far, it's just ridiculous. I mean, I follow Stevie Chambers. One, because he's an absolute nut, he is absolutely psychotic. I'm convinced of it. Two, Stevie Chambers did something really brave two years ago. He wrote a blog post and his company came after him, wanting to kill him, fire him and everything else. It was basically come across that line. And I thought at that point regardless of what I think about Stevie Chambers' opinion I need to support the people who are stand up and lay their job on the line to say something really ugly, right? No, it's fine. So, that's my culture hack for the day. If you've got it in you, if you can line up three or four jobs for next week, do something radical at work to push someone else forward. Not some process, not some tool, not some project. Find someone who you think has it in them, lay your job on the line and push them forward.forge , a culture act. Who? Yeah, Dave Ramsey, a motivational speaker, a great leadership company, in his book leadership. He talks about two types of people: Tigers and Koala bears. He says tigers are ones who, they live without fear. They don't worry about their job they belief so much on themselves that they will figure in out right they walk the line all the time they will take the risk who look very cute and cuddly, but actually can kill a human instantly. And people don't realize that about koalas, right? So koalas, they might be quiet, they might be reserved, but yet they're powerful and they're usually doped up. How do you say that. But the thing with it is, koalas, what they gravitate toward and what they The excel app is making tiger shine. They are excellent support, like having an administrative, I had an administrative assistant that is vigilant.a koala and I'm more of ice consumers, more the tiger, I take risks. I would not have been successful. I think you're more of a cougar than being a trade show host. Yeah. Oh, whatever. Right. All right. Beran, culture hacks. I tweeted it this week. If you need a tool for something and you've got the ability to use it, just use it we needed a defect tracking tool at our work recently, and we didn't have one so I built one and just started you sing it and sent it to the senior leadership and says, "Look, this is what I'm doing. I think that's a good way to push innovation." Yes and I know I am talking about tools but you can apply that level. So if you think that something is right, and it's working for you, just do it. I think that's one of the best. And what is the, say Frank say? FILDI? F it, let's do it. Yeah, you're my Koala bear. So, I like calling that the do now ask forgiveness later. Yup. I do. That's key. There are certain things that you just have to. Perhaps, John WIllis. I think that the easy ones and then there's my wish list ones. And the easy ones are the ones who are, basically, building slack into the work environment. Which is counter intuitave to most environments. If anything we learn from workflow and all that, that creating slack. Kanban happens to be a good example of a tool, one of many but, that can force slack in the workplace. I think it all boils down to things like hack days and places where you can find innovation through the people's ability to innovate by giving them slack time, and not looking, you know, using kind of efficiency syndromes. On the long-term horizon, after this last week's velocity, and you know, having all these discussions about culture. You know, I want to think more about what are the things that can be measured you know, and now I get into freak science stuff. But other things that we can measure, the soft things we don't even try. We measure everything, but we don't measure that affects our behavior

  • Sophie's Choice and Ivanka's Asset - ITSM weekly the podcast EPISODE 91
    Mindful Cyborgs
    01:01:37
    ITSM
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    Show Notes & Links: http://www.servicesphere.com/blog/2012/6/25/sophies-choice-and-ivankas-asset-itsm-weekly-the-podcast-epi.html Show Notes: ITSM Weekly Podcast Top of the World Premier Hank Marquis looking for ITIL training (Jobs from Global Knowledge) Evernote Activity Stream Microsoft purchases Yammer vs Facebook purchasing Instagram itSMF Fusion 2012, Where the heck are the MEGA sponsors? IBM Pulse Rejected from itSMF What makes someone "ITSM Practitioner" Practitioner Radio, the REAL ITSM podcast? Axios does Social IT webinar Does Axios "borrow" a lot of material? Shame. Who's bigger your internet fans or the LAW? How the Oatmeal is changing the game. ITSM Extreme Make Over Sophie Klossner Retires from HDI Sophie Klossner on the Podcast (July 2010) Send Sophie a note and thank her for her contributions. IT Consultants don't create innovation Article Nancy Regan and psychics Dancy's World, the Blog helping to define and exploit the bull crap going on in the Social Web. Apocalyptic Enthusiasms from the IT Skeptic Dramatic Live Reading, Edict Five, Email is a full time JOB! SDI Conference Ovum ITSM Conference The IT Service Desk / Help Desk of 2017-2050 James Timpson, Keynote Barclay Rae at SDI The Service Desk Inspector The Real Gene Kim itSMF New England Event When IT Fails, Novel and Event 50 Shades of ITIL Serena Software's Fake CIO account Kanban for ITSM The IT Skeptic is hot for Kanban "Stop starting and start finishing." The IT Skeptic, Service Catalog Meltdown Article G2G3 Simulation Dr. Suzanne Van Hove ITSM Prism ITSM Standard to show the metric of Value What is DEVOPS, dramatic reading from Wikipedia. Kinsight (Kinect tool for remote) Ivanka Menken, Intanglible Assets tweets The Ivanka Menken Blog on IT Assets What is the DEEP security value to Social Media? The new currency isn't money, it's access to information. Windmill Ted Talk Fiat Currency is wrecking the world economies Best and Worst Cities to Work and Play CIO.com Internet Explorer Tax? Pay more for using crappy browsers. Dotted Line Reporting After 17 years, I'm sleeping with the enemy IT the World Streaming Conference Big Shout out to Carlos Casanova itSMF USA podcast Show Transcription: ITSM Weekly, the podcast bringing you news, insight, analysis, and information from the world of IT service management. Your hosts, Matthew Hooper, Chris Anthony, and Matt Baron. IT service managment weekly, the podcast starts now. Welcome to ITSM Weekly the podcast, episode 91 for the week ending, we'll make it June 20th, because we're always a little bit in the future. Something like that. How are you guys doing? Excellent. Fantastic. I'm Chris Hansen with Dateline NBC. Those are the 5 words I never want to hear. Past 5 days have flown by for a clean June 20th. Yes, well said. We're going to go ahead and record today we have a very special guest on. That special guest is my invisible friend. No. Let's get going right with some news Darren, do you have anything for us? Tons. We should mention Top of the World premier. Another podcast. You can listen to Aleruses' real voice, if you so choose. I thought Debilling did a pretty good job owning that. We'll see where that goes. It's kind of fun to listen to the Swedish accent or the Norwegian accent because I get a lot that around here in Minnesota. Yes, I thought it was a very good show. I thought Ross did a nice music is custom for ITSM Weekly Top of the World edition. And somebody even made fun saying it reminded them of that old song "I'm on top of the world looking down on creation." Oh well. Yeah, it was a good show. I do not know Hooper, you haven't had a chance to listen to it. You're still recovering from the drama that was, I don't know, the situation with math challenge. In your new office that's kind of nice. I'm in my new office, yes. So, tell us a little bit about this office you're in now. It's in Kabul, that's why in a tent. You're in Kabul. No, my new office is my back yard. Beautiful here. That's nice. What a beautiful day it is. As a kid did you ever camp in the back. Oh, wow. That was really nice. Maybe we should do a podcast completely outside once. We should. I'm down. Yeah. I'll go out right now. Yeah, we used to do that as kids I grew up more in the city. So camping for me wasn't as much of an experience as it would be for my kids camping in this backyard. Every time I camped as a kid, it always turned out awkward for everyone. Yeah. I'm sure. Every time I've podcasted as an adult, it turned out awkward for everyone. That's right. I would always hear, ...to wrestle you so freakin' bad. I want to wrestle you so freakin' bad. It was just one of those things as a child it just never worked out well for anyone. Yes. It's kind of like teaching ITIL. Speaking of teaching ITIL, did you see [Hay Marquois] is looking for ITIL trainers? No, I didn't. I missed that. Where is, where did he land right now? he's back at global knowledge we talked about it last week, but I wouldn't want you to pay attention while you're recording. Not while you're recording, before and only before. Yeah, what's funny if you read that tweet in England, it means he's looking for altoid sneakers, which is awkward for everyone as well. Trainers? Yeah, trainers. What do they call them in the UK, teachers? No, they call sneakers trainers I thought. Or maybe they call sweatpants trainers. I would think that they'd call trainers sneakers. Terrible. OK, so other news: Evernote to release activity stream today. I saw that, but it looked like it was just for windows. Oh, really I did not see if it does. 'Cause it's not on mine. I saw you tweet that you were excited about it. I thought, It's just on the Windows client. What are you, backsliding? Another reason that I have to install VM again. Or another reason just to actually pay attention to what you actually click on and read. Come on, Chris. Don't give me that. If it's on PC, it's coming on Mac. I think it's a great idea. I think everything should have an activity and if you disagree with me, I know you're lying. Dude, I'm still overwhelmed with what you like something from Miami Vice Circa '91. We got like Crockett and Tubbs. Is that truly a sports jacket, I should have put a sports jacket on. No. If I'd got the memo I would have. You've got a little bit of man. If actually had the time to read the show notes before we recorded I would have. Yeah. I won't give you a hard time, I know you're still recovering. So I guess other pseudo-industry news, so Facebook wanted to become relevant, so they spent a billion dollars on Instagram. Microsoft wants to be relevant, so they spend a billion dollars on Yammer. Whoa . I hope it gets more enterprises using Yammer, because it's a part that is infused in a lot of enterprises. You know it would be funny. I wish that Microsoft would take that billion dollars and actually fix their whole life platform which was already a social network, and they could have actually used it to integrate better with Groove, right? So maybe if they just stopped blowing money on other companies and just fixed their own stuff, that would be a little helpful. I remember Groove. I really liked Groove. Groove's great. It was a way that I could have document on my machine but it was also on your machine, It was like Drop Box before Drop Box. That's right, yeah. Groove's a phenomenal technology. Microsoft has picked up so much phenomenal technology and they just destroy it. It sounds familiar! Talking about BMC. So I thought it was really interesting I got an email from ITSMF Fusion. I think you wanna get forward in, and actually we could, to examine why actually that's Edgar Allan Poe. No different. But to figure out why they changed their hashtag from Fusion 12 to SM Fusion or whatever that name it is. But the thing I found most interesting about the ITSMF Fusion, if you're going to that event, here in North America down at the Gaylord Texan, again two words you never together. The platinum sponsor, there's only one platinum sponsor for ITSMF Fusion Guess what mega company is the platinum sponsor? I may know who it is. Who is it? Merryville Technologies. So Merryville Technologies Technology is the platinum sponsor. Guess who the next level down, gold sponsors. Service Now. Isn't IBM one of them? Yep. Serena Software? Nope. will kill this game. Skull sponsors Axios, IBM, and Main Engine, Axios by the way just released... I said IBM Yes, I know you did. What? He said yes to that. there, you happy? Remember, I'm another generation. I need to be affirmed every 30 seconds. That's what Mrs. Barron says. And then some response was you've got no consulting portal, our friend Mainville, people start x-ing Bronze sponsors, service now, what i thought was real interesting thing about that was all the, you know, companies you considered bigger have settled down to the bottom, and then, you know, the mix is there, which kind of makes me wonder We see a lot of the big players missing from shows CA? I don't even think CA's on the list. No they're not. Maybe companies just get so big that they don't they don't need that type of exposure any more at these conferences. Why do you think this looks so backward to me? Well, I know IBM pulled out a few years ago of the show because they had their owned show going on at the same time. Pulse Yeah, Pulse. What was that, eight, nine, ten? They all blur together, I can't remember. Did you say Vicki I said they all blend in together. Who's Vicki Vale? Yeah, so check that out I thought that was pretty interesting. I will not be speaking at Fusion. Did you Did you submit? Of course I submitted. You got rejected. I wouldn't say that. I would not say rejected. I would say I rejected them. Oh, okay. You asked them and they said no, but you showed them, What do you think I'm doing now? Yeah, I'm sure they're all more of their members listen to this than actually go to that show. So, interesting question from Twitter, somebody by the name of CoopsScotty wanted me to ask you both. Okay, dumb question, but what makes ITSM practitioner or ITSM. What makes ITSM practitioner? That's the question. Okay, dumb question, what makes ITSM practitioner? So Hoop, Baron, for those people who say we don't ITSM enough I think the term, we complain about the term because of the fact that there were those who were consultants versus those who were practitioners and we were differentiating between a practitioner who was the person within the organization who is actually fulfilling IT service services, right? They're the ones who are supplying the delivery or the outcome of the IT service. As opposed to a vendor who might have products or or a vendor who might have services that is augmenting or adding some value to that service supply chain. And we take issue with it, I believe, as a as the three of us, that we are all practitioners if we practice in some form, delivering a service that enables technology to supply a business outcome. Right. So why are we differentiating? I don't know. I just thought he had a valid question. He wanted to know what makes someone an ITSM. It's a good question. It's a good question. Yeah. And if I just started listening to this show and heard us speak about it, I'd be like, "What in the heck are these guys talking about? That makes no sense." I really think some of it's come up on the show, more from the fact that we've mostly had vendors on. We've had more vendors on vendors and I hate that term vendor too. But people who are an external provider of service as opposed to the ones who are internal. We've hadWe got a few folks from companies, but we mostly had people from product companies or consulting companies. Well, Tori do a little radio show called practitioner radio. I mean, are we lying when we say that? Just because it's not radio. Yeah, you're liars. I'm okay with that. That last part was really good, too. I liked Troy's point about in-sourcing that it's not about getting their services into your company. It's about getting people into company and making them apply to your rules and using your systems. Not necessarily just saying, "Send out all your tasks". It's not outsourcing. It's good stuff. Axis had a webinar, two webinars this week with ITSM queen, our friend Sharon Taylor. She's become an expert on social IT now, her and a few of the gardener folks, but what I've found really interesting about the presentation was, they tweeted out not one, not two, but three.copy of my quotes. So I've got screenshots of them all, I'll put them in the show notes. Actually if you want to borrow my material, I mean, not a problem, just make sure you ask me for it. You put it on Twitter. Or retweet. By the way, Axios, yeah we won't say it, I forgot we can't bleep now that we're live. It's not that they read my tweets. They actually took stuff from a presentation and read it word for word as if it was their own. Oh, it wasn't tweets? Well yeah, I wish it was that nice. Do you know why? Here's a funny story, I won't name the company. Why not? Because I won't. Alright. Oh you still need funding. It was a previous partner of vigilance they actually took a deck that we had put together, took some of those materials out of it, put it their own presentation. And then when I showed up to present my materials, which had the same material, they followed up with a cease and desist letter to me to stop using materials which they basically stole from me. Wow. Where I had to go back and ask them to please produce the original materials and who actually created it and produce the name, and they couldn't. That's like what's going on with the Oatmeal right now, have you guys seen that? Yeah. No, tell me about it. So the Oatmeal's like a comic book site and basically there's another site. It's called Funky Junk and what Funky Junk does is it's like any other Pinterest or regurgitation site. You take funny stuff and you post it. So this bunch of people who post things they find that are interesting on the web. So Funky Junk had a bunch of the oatmeal cartoons actually on their site and the guy that runs the Oatmeal just kind of wrote on his site, hey, it's nice of you you steal my stuff you could at least say where it came from. Long story short, I'll put a link in the show notes, Funky Junk retained a lawyer and then sent the oatmeal a letter.and then the last paragraph of the letter says, according to this demand, you are hereby to perform the following remedial acts on or before June 12. Remove all mention of FunnyJunk and funnyjunk.com from The Oatmeal, your website, and any other you have control of. And deliver a check for $20,000 payable to the order of FunnyJunk, LLC. to this lawyer. So what The Oatmeal guy did was he created this comic and started a fund drive. And what he decided to do was he wanted to raise $20,000. Original demand. Take a photograph of it. And then donate it to charity. In eleven days, since he has retaliated, he has now on the Indiegogo fundraising site, raised 169,688 dollars. Yeah he hit the 20 G's in an hour. It's brilliant, his comics are fantastic. Good for him. I didn't give any money though. I would if you could crowd source your ITIL project. You can. Just post in on back to ITSM and people will answer your questions. I meant, like fund it. Since like companies are actually gonna fund it. Oh fund. Well, that's what we try to do with ITSM Extreme Makeover. Yeah. Some sad news in the IT world. We learned this week that Sophie Klossner, also a guest on the show, from HTI, and that's North America's... I'm just taking time to explain all the references this week HDI's just a lot of Klonopin this morning. North America's service and support organization. She's retiring as of the end of July. From HDI or altogether? Now that does not say. It just says, "With a heavy heart, HTI will be retiring after 20 plus years with Think HTI. Please give us your favorite Sophie moment." So, I was shocked. It took forever and no on put anything, but I put one out there. If any of our listeners know, or are an HDI member, of have ever met Sophie seen Sylvia at a conference, make sure you head out to the website. I'll put a link in the show notes where you can check that out. Or if you're watching on the Livestream now, you can check out HTI Connect and you'll see something from Dan Orrly right there. Good for her. Baron, you look bored. So, what are you writing? No. I have to write it down, so I make sure to put my memory on. And I saw the post. I just didn't post right away because I had to think about it for a while. She's a good kid, you know? Can you hold on while I pull up a notepad and gather some notes on what you're about to say? Come on. Do not. I need to write things down because I forget. I have ADHD. Squirrel! Prove it Snort an Adderall right now. I met her lots of time, she always remembers who I am. Maybe not my name, but she always remembers my face. Any news from you before I move on. A fantastic article about this CIO says that IT consultants don't have any innovation. They don't innovate in this enterprise anymore, so. So a CIO is telling the world that IT people or IT consultants don't know innovation. That's nice. He says when he needs real innovation he talks to entrepreneurs and start-up owners. And Nancy Reagan talked to a psychic. I mean, I don't see the relevance of this. And so, I think it is an interesting article because he's obviously choosing the wrong consulting vendors, it's really what it is. Or, he's just trying to make headlines. Who is it? It's possible. Don't say 'cause with my luck, "That's a freaking customer" or something. Equinix? They might be. I have no idea what you're talking about. so we'll move on. So have either of you had a chance to read my series over at the ITSM review called Dancy's World? Yes. Wait, I thought that was just a collection of of your posts. This is Martin Thompson's Yeah. I read some of it. Well, thank you. I've done five now they seem to be very, very provocative. I think that would be the word. What I find most interesting about this is that last night, someone asked me, "Why are you doing that? Why are you writing those over on his site?" And literally guys People think I'm a... Egomaniac? Yeah and some other bad words. So I thought I need a place where I can actually blog like the monster people paint you to be. So you should be a witch on his site and been a, what did Skepp call you? He called you something. I got it in the show notes today. He referred to me as an apoca-. An apoplectic enthusiasm. Apoplectic, yeah, enthusiasm, yeah. I don't know what he was trying to get across there. But I We would do a dramatic live reading each week from Dancy's World. Awesome. All right. That's a fantastic idea. OK. Do you mind? Is that OK with you? No. OK, wait, wait. Can we entitle this deep thoughts with Dancy? So this week is edict five and edict five is entitled in 2012 processing email isn't a skill, it's a full time career and an excerpt from edict five. People have been pronouncing the death of e-mail since the first email was sent. I'm sure with 100% of my futuristic talents, the e-mail's not gone anywhere. But e-mail as a skill, once it's created and sits in a container called your e-mail, your inbox is actually a dead skill. This is not because it's going to be useful moving forward. It's because in a sharing economy, we need to do more create silos of dead knowledge. I squarely blame the baby boomers, who used metrics from the nineteenth century factory mentality from preventing this depression in knowledge workers. I believe deeply in the organic nature of things, the rise of skills and the death of skills. Unfortunately, no one is running around screaming learn to create non-dead things. Think about it. Even a Microsoft Word document is dead. Where do you share this document? How do you collaborate on it? To make matters worse, will then take that word document, put it in an email, and send it to a peer. It's like you're tying a papyrus to a pterodactyl and letting it free from your cave. That's been this week's dramatic reading. I love how you're able to turn it on and out, Chris. You just say that all the time, sweetie. All right. So, I'm heading to England tomorrow. I'm keynoting at SDI in an Ovom conference over there. Who are you keynoting with? Who are the other keynotes? SDI, I'm doing the service desk of 2017. So, basically I've built a deck around supporting the first versions of AI. So, what do you do when a computer calls you. And then moving through to bio-ethicism, so supporting people who are hybrids all the way through supporting robots. so I think it's really awesome that one of your co-keynotes is a guy named James Timson. Yes. How did you know that? Well, 'cause I actually prepped. and so this guy James...That's a lie. We all know it. I actually really did prep. James Simpson, he never asked me if I wanted to do news. James Timson actually...After five weeks, I gave up. That's called a trend, right? So here's really interesting so I'm reading the bio on this guy, James Timpson. I guess Timpsons are all over the place. They're a family business in the UK. There's a ton of them. So, what are they known for? Well they're known for shoe repair, which is interesting, watch repair, engravers and key cutters. So what's really interesting is what are they also known for? Well they are the largest recruiters of ex-offenders in the UK. Whoa. So they have stores that cut keys into watch repair and they also hire people who are criminals. Former criminals. Reformed criminals. Yeah. Reformed Criminals. I guess it makes perfect sense. Does it say reformed? Or what does it say? Does it say reformed, or what does it say? It says ex-offenders. Ex-offenders. I was an offender but I quit. Or me and offending were together, but we're not anymore. Everyone's offended someone. do you think they go to Xavier's School for read-a-mind? Well, I'm sure that there's like a Carnegie Mellon for crooks and the UK. Yeah, well there's one in America called Harvard. This is true. They usually end up becoming politicians. Yeah. We can't talk about politics. So...I saw He's also going to be one of your keynote speakers. He's just presenting, he's not a keynote. Please don't affect my ego like that. You're sharing the stage with Barkley Ray. No, Barkley Ray is sharing the stage with me. You know Barkley, just hit him when he's there. I love Barkley. Yyou know it's really funny. Three years ago Barkley came up to me in Waterloo Station in London. He says to me, he just left Axios at the time and he goes, "Chris." You know, I can't do a Scottish accent. I can't do a Scottish accent, so I make him an old Jewish gay woman. I have to ask you - how do you make money doing any of those, with any of those tweets and stuff? That social media just doesn't make sense. Why would anybody do that? Yeah and then a year later he's the service desk inspector with a TV show. So...Get into my belly. Get into my belly, get into my. Wait we just. Live. Shut up I just forgot it was live. So Hooper, you rate into our friend the real Gene Kim. The real Gene Kim what a guy, what a guy. So you have to say that you're paid to. Well, we're not sure we're disclosing that yet, Beran. But, yeah, he is fantastic. He was a great presenter at ITSMF during once which we had a pretty good turn out. I was actually pretty impressed. And he did a great job talking about Deb Ops, just nails it. He so gets the point of operations and IT operations. So, it was a privilege to finally meet him in person. Oh, you'd never met him? I had never met him before, no. I mean I'm a huge visible ops fan. In every ITIL training I've ever given, I always talked about fragile CIs and had to make sure that people knew that that actually wasn't an ITIL term but It was a real world term that works and you should remember this after the test. It was great to meet him. So I ended up...we ended up chatting a little bit. I had the opportunity to take him to the airport. I told him I'd give him a ride. I'm riding in your car. You turn on the radio, you're pulling me closer, I just say no. Yeah, I Absolutely sure this the image that Gene wants to have of the. Of the Pointer sisters. Now was it in the hoop. Was it in the hoop, do we have the same thing I wrote in? Yes. Okay. I don't you own. No. Yeah. Nope. Neither did he. Nope. No, I no longer drive fancy cars. I have a Hyundai Sonata. A Hyundai. How do you pronounce that? Hyundai? Hyundai? Yeah. That sounds pretty fancy. Yeah, you add some extra syllables to make it more relevant. Yes, it's like Target. And Harororo. so Gene is writing a novel. This is really exciting news. When IT Fails? When IT Fails. And he gave me the opportunity to do a review on it and to read some of it and give it some feedback, which I found to be a really nice compliment. I dug into it, started reading it, and gave him some feedback. He had a submitted so I couldn't get too far, but boy, he's got it nailed. I'm reading the book, I found myself yelling at the people in the book, like come on you idiot, you know that's not how should you be releasing something. It is such a book for people who have been in IT Operations, VP IT of Operations or Network Administrator. So it's fifty shades of change their minds though. Yes, I kiss in porn What really interesting is a year ago he gave me a draft of this book, a year ago. And I was going through it, and I came back to him and said, "to build a marketing plan around this, right now you need to create all of the characters in the books as twitter accounts. And over the next year, have this roll out. No one listens to. And you should have created LinkedIn accounts for them. Dude, of course. Actually got them hired in different companies and. They were awesome. I mean it's Serena dog, which is Serena's. It's not even the head of their CIO. It's the character who plays the CIO for Serena. And if he's real but Jean King can write real characters. Yes. It's good though. You're gonna love the book. It's actually very well written. I give him so much credit. You know writing a book is hard enough, but to write a novel around ITSM, and kind of like IT-focused and for geeks, and not have to explain what a Sen is and all that kind of stuff, I mean that's brassy, so I applaud him. I think that's great. It says a lot about the industry too, that we're ready for that type of thing. But even beyond that, I tell you, as an individual so, I got the opportunity kind of share with him what were doing with smack, and he broke out in to this iPad frenzy and he started to show me this tool he built called Tweet Scribe which I'm now using which is awesome. I don't know if you've seen it, Chris? Of course. You do know who I am right? Yeah, yeah. You're such a snob. So he breaks into this interviewing process that was just fantastic. He gave me all his notes. He told me, this is how you have to interview people to get requirements. This is how you have focus on the use case. This is how you build a story and he also talked about this Con bon theory during ITSMF . Was it Con bon? I thought it was Cobon. He called it Con bon. If he pronounced it Conbon, that's right then. I mean, it's like, if he were to say horrible is pronounced horrirrible, it would actually be legitimate. Right. Cam-ban. Can-ban. The IT skeptic's all hot for Can-ban. He's a lot closer to Asian than I think the three of us are so I'm gonna go with kanban. You know, you don't have to make it racial. You know what? I'm gonna play the race card on that one. Play the race card. So Next you'll be telling me I'm a fairy. No, I'm not gonna go there. All right. So kanban theory, the work in progress piece of it, you can only have so many pieces of work in progress. And so here's an awesome expression that I have been saying over and over again since then: "I need to stop starting and start finishing". Yeah, most people call that work! No no no no no no no no no. No, I'm just kidding. It's not work. I know, I know. It's accomplishment. See I'm a very hard worker and I work a lot. I know, I know. I don't accomplish anything. Do you know what I have sitting on my desk? I'll show you how nuts I am. Look what's sitting on my desk. Yeah, it's holding your monitor up like. No, the other day I was actually working on some service catalog stuff believe it or not. Can we talk about ITSM? Okay Frank. No, so the IT skeptic, whatever his name is there, had a meltdown the other week and wrote this article about train stations and menus and service catalogs as if coming down with stone tablets error from. Did he talk about IT services at all, or is he still on a kick about the fact that, or has he finally succumbed to the fact there is no such thing as an IT service. I have no idea what he's doing. Oh,It's just, I hate the whole service catalog conversation, I'm tired of it. Unfortunately I have a day job now so You don't argue as much? It's amazing how much nothing has changed in a decade. Yeah so, tweet it. NO Now, I am very excited to potentially be involved with another G2G3 simulation. How is that gonna work? We've got a woman named Susan you know who she is, Susan Vanderholf Vanderhoven Oh yeah She was on, she's one of those ones with the 100 buttons Yeah shes got alots of those All black betty bam ba lam, Oh thats something else So hopefully were going to get her up to a client that we're working with, as I mentioned from consulting with us, compliance process partners Valerie Rajh and J. Martin, good folks, good Good team. Good team. Good team. Good team. So looking forward to that. Yes, Suzanne is on the board and I know she has something to do with Prism. Yes. Which was a wildly successful initiative. Did you see that tweet I had about the Boston consulting firm and IBM. Is it IBM or is it HP? Two years ago they came up with a standard for measuring IT Service Value. Have you heard about this standard? He remained in business and didn't get laid off. Have you heard about this standard. Have you heard about it? No I missed that. I apologize. Of course not, no one heard about it. They spent, like, 150,000 dollars Now you know how I feel when I do the news. He's sitting up there getting upset with us because we don't know some obscure standard he prepped three days to tell us all about. No, the point is that you don't know what it is. Did you guys read my recent post about Jonathon Feldman's how an enterprise needs to work like a startup. Where he interviewed Eric Ries. Did either one of you read that one? Did you? Did you? Hooper, Baron and I don't even follow you any more. I don't. I can't. How am I going to hire my PHP developer if you guys don't? Oh. Your self-deprecation is hilarious. Oh, you're one to talk. So tell us about your standard that no one's heard of. Well, I tweeted it two years ago. That they spent all this money on this standard, it was a $150,000 or something to develop this standard. And Memolane reminded me that I tweeted it. And I was like, 'Oh, OK.' And so I searched for it. You know, has it gone anywhere? Who is using it? No one's using it, no one's heard of it. Where did all this money come from? It's public sector money and it's just wasted. Sounds like big government at work. Yeah, sad. It was really funny. While you were talking about Gene Kim I thought I'd bring up the Wikipedia entry for DevOps. Have you guys ever looked up what DevOps is in Wikipedia? No. I have before, yeah. Would you like to know? Dramatic, dramatic was dramatic, DevOps is a software development method that stresses communication collaboration integration between software developers and information professionals. All right, that's been your DevOps dramatic reading. What the hell is wrong with me? Alright. Its funny google hang out like makes you quieter now because you yelled so loud and now you're quieter to the rest of us he's being really loud. I can't get over that you're wearing that jacket and a t shirt. I need to look more professional. Someone ribbed me because all I wear is t shirts when we're recording this. What's wrong with wearing T-shirts while we record this? I'm actually wearing my first V-neck because I got my back waxed so now I can wear things like that. Well no, it was getting on my nerves because as I get older I get a little fuzzy up on my shoulders. Yeah, I get it, trust me I get it. And I look over my shoulder, to look in the mirror to make sure that I get that parting glance just correctly. Yeah, you look like a bantam. Oh, goodness. Can we get some hair gel out and do up my shoulders? Another cool use for the Kinect, someone came out with this thing called Kinosite and it keeps track of where a remote is. So if you lose it in the couch, it says, hey, it's in the couch. You know, the places I lose my remote Gross. Hey, what did you guys think of the Ivanka Menken CMDB of intangible assets thing? The thing that I invoked her to write like the power of Christ that compelled her. Good, thank you. It was really funny because she was like, Chris Dancy made me write this, and I was like, the power of Christian invokes you, the power of Chris invokes you. Of Chris. So what was it. See, she went to an EO thing EO for those of you that don't know is Entrepreneurs' Organization and it's all motivational speakers. A lot of motivational speakers lately if you're watching conference streams. It's amazing how many people are unmotivated, but suddenly motivated to tweet something that they'll never pay attention to or follow. But she was listening to this speaker who was then talking about the intangible assets of an organization and how to value them. And, she tweeted it. Then, I of course, with my little bit of accounting background, said, isn't that we just call goodwill on a balance sheet? It's actually an asset; it's something that carries a value. So, six hours later she came back and said 'no, no, no.' And I said 'whatever.' Then she wrote this blog and we put a link in it, so what did you think? The statistic that jumped out at me that she tweeted was that in 1985 they said 32 percent of all assets from an SMP500 market value.. 32% were intangible of all assets from everyone that was on the SMP500 Now its 81% so if you look at the way that they treated IP back then terrible way of treating IP. and now the way that we treat it today it seems logical that we would need, it goes to your knowledge locker thing, that you were talking talking about Chris. I know, but it. What you know and what your employees know is more valuable than what you have. Well I was working on a documentary service now, talking about the value of having activity stream. And besides all the social stuff I said what's nice is your IP is protected 'cause it's in the cloud with your stuff and it's not like it's lost anywhere. So I don't know how I feel about that stat because I did read her post. I think in some ways scares me not as a business person but more as like a human. Cause I look at all the money that didn't exist in the markets, that just kind of evaporated when the markets went nuts. Yeah. And when I hear about, you know, what was the set? Eighty five percent of value...? It was 81%. Eighty one percent of corporate value assets today are are intangible. That's pretty crazy. It's bad. Cooper, you're a business person and smart. See, I take a different perspective all together. Of course you do, that's why you're on the show. If you agreed with us, we wouldn't have you. Assets don't have to be tangible to be valuable, right? I mean you have your greatest asset in your organization is your knowledge. Right, I think we're not disagreeing with that. We're agreeing that it's now 80% of the value of a business instead of 30% as it was twenty years ago. More of the business is intangible assets. Yeah, but i think thats good though. I mean if you look at where you wanna drive an economy at a scale. We want to be a society of people who are knowledged workers, right? I mean, you hate to say it and try to ignore that there's a class war that goes on globally, but there does and there is so if we can be a country full of, you know, high end professional knowledge workers, lawyers, doctors, people who basically set and regulate society versus the ones who actually have to put bolts in little trinkets and things like that then that's of higher value. So in every civilization that has these classes of workers, there's always some form of income inequality whether it be CCX whatever is making 90% and this move to this knowledge economy or reputation economy, something I don't talk about purposely in my presentations 'cause I think it would scare a lot of people. I mean just topic scares people that you know they have got some type of algorithm scoring them, and then I entered the society of a knowledge locker, but to me the really scary thing about this is in an economy like the one you described where money really isn't the thing that's making people inequal. So what is it going to be? In my opinion, it's gonna be access to information. access of information is the foundation of every single democracy on earth. So we're actually heading to a really scary point in time, as far as I'm concerned in humanity. Well did the see the windmill thing that Skep posted. No. It's a Ted Talk about a guy who in Africa, Myanmar I think and they're...can't produce enough food and he doesn't have any access to water. I thought Myanmar was on the other side of Thailand. It's not Myanmar then. Okay. I am not the best to geography in any case and to be honest I did not pay that much attention to be getting of it, but. We always get that assumption. [ xx] between Bangladesh and Thailand. Access to information has made you very powerful, Hooper. Actually, I had a friend who did volunteer work in Miyamart [sp?] You are wearing T-shirt shared with the entire Asian continent on. Actually that's what the grapesville. He went to. He went to the library and read about a windmill, and he built a windmill, and he's got a line that's as long as the city is of people that want to charge iphones and charge their cell phones on this wind mill. That access to information that he got for a few moments there King of the town. Yeah. You're talking about William Kamkwamba, does that sound familiar? William Kamkwamba? Like I said, did not pay attention. He just looked it up. Watch his eyes and watch what he does. Watching the TED talk right now, you guys keep going on. You could at least like hide your video or something. it's about resource though, right? He has a resource. Right. And what was his value? Was his value the windmill or was it the energy that came out of the windmill. His value was the publicity around the damn windmill. Ah, no his personal value's. Now the only people who fear everybody becoming heroes, is heroes. The only people fear everybody becoming a superstar superstars. Someone the other day, well, that goes on a bunch of things. The only reason we have the dollar value is because there is the Wall Street The Wall Street "The Wall Street?" like "The Internet?" "The Wall Street," yeah. What?! Have you started drinking when you're off the clock? Where is all of this coming from? I'm just saying, if you stop often looked at it from a rational, social standpoint, the dollar has zero value. It's called fiat currency. Look it up right now since you're so quick on the Internet. That's exactly correct and its because of the simple fact that we are being gameified and we have been gameified from mostly the Let's just blame the British or the Romans, one or the other. I think it goes back a little further than that but, yeah. Right? and this is exactly -- people say, you know, "What does this have to do with how people react in corporations and other things?" That is exactly the point. If you look at any, people who say the word and building their Empire building, that's exactly what they're doing. They're trying to overstate their dependency. Power . Yeah. And their power. And their value. But ultimately, knowledge workers are going to come to a point where you've only-- you've got so much knowledge available to you, you've got so much knowledge, you know, banked that you can trade or I mean, to me access to information is the new currency. But I won't go there. Let's talk about bringing your own device because this is another one of those things. I truly believe the reason bring your own device is such a crazy topic right now is because it truly represents again the income inequality in organizations. If I show up with a mapbook retina tomorrow at work, everyone's gonna think, "How much are they paying Chris?" They're not gonna think, "What a nice device." And again, I think, you wouldn't ask a plumber to come in to your house and use your wrench. You wouldn't ask a painter to come out of the house andYou wouldn't ask me to come work for you and use your equipment. Awesome. And as a knowledge worker we need to be sensitive to what BYOD actually is. and a lot of it's a threat to their bread and butter. That's a great analogy. Dude, you know who I am. But the plumber does come to my house and ask to use the toilet. He doesn't bring his own toilet. can guarantee you, if there's a plumber in your house, he's peeing in a can in his truck. Yeah. Have you ever been...I don't even want to go in to other people's bathrooms, although I always look in the medicine cabinet. I don't know what it is. There is something magical about other people's medicine cabinets. Who has medicine cabinets anymore? I do. Really? medicine cabinet. Dude do you know many meds I have? No, I don't. I am sure you have meds. I know you have meds. Hooper just rolled his eyes. That's awesome. thats the craziest super thing I've ever seen. Hey so I don't know if you've all seen this thing, I was looking at this earlier, it the vespa some worst cities to work and play. Okay. For some reason it was on CIO.com. I know why it was on CIO.com 'cause CIO.com sucks. Oh, it's horrible. It's was in the section, It was really funny. I mean, I would definitely put this in the show notes. You won't. Man, so they say Australia, they have like a down thumb. It's just a picture of a shark. It's literally, like, you know, something you'd see on Mashable or something. I have no idea why. It's like CIO.com could not go downhill faster. One does not simply live in Australia. All right. I don't know why CIO won't even be talking about that. Do you have any other news, Beran. I see you've got a few things here before we go because we're getting to the top of the show here. My gripe Taleo sucks. We haven't done gripe of the week in a long time. Oh, we have. Yeah. We used to do gripe of the week. You know those hiring platforms are just terrible. You know, I haven't applied to a job in a long time because I don't really think that's the best way to get a job, it's better to just talk to people. Man those application tools? I tried doing it in a grocery store paying for food, it just doesn't work. Is this breaking news now that you're looking for work? No, I was just -- yes. Definitely. Every time. All the time. Everyday. Any one who is a consultant is always looking for work. But no, it totally sucks. I can't believe that it still is in business. Bodery streaming? Did you guys check out Bodery streaming at all? No. Oh, man, it's better than going to the concert. You don't have to touch any sweaty, dirty people, you don't have to use a Porta-Potty, but you see -- What are you talking about? Bonnaroo. it's a music festival in California. Oh, my God, I feel so old. Do you have any idea what he's talking about, Hooper? I really don't, no. They streamed it live on YouTube, like the entire concert, so every single venue, every single artist on there for free. Really? This is fantastic. Absolutely fantastic. Ah this is a good one! There's a site... I think it's in the UK. What's their bloody name? I can say that because I went to a UK dealer. You suddenly can't think of something and you turn into an English person. What's the bloody name? Cogan. And if you use Internet Explorer, they tax everything that you buy on their site an additional seven percent, because you're using Internet Explorer. Fantastic. No way, really? Just to make you not use Internet Explorer on the site. Exactly, you got a link. That's brilliant. Download Firefox. Download Chrome and you don't have to pay this tax but people still pay it. That is gonna be my smack marketing stragtegy. I tell you right now, IE is killing us. It's terrible. Then why is it not supported. Because too many people use it? Too many people use it so we're working with a bunch of recruitment firms right now target market is the hunters. And so they were all like...like we have one client who's IE 7. And they're a national firm. And it's cause their homegrown tracking system uses IE 7. And we're just like, 'All right, you know, can can you get Chrome on there? And can you just open two browsers?' Nice. Oh, it's killing this whole week instead of putting out, this is actually part of that article I was talking about earlier with Eric Ries inside of Innovation. You still see these big companies spend 80% of their time keeping the light on us and twenty percent innovating. But this is exactly the reason. It's like, you know, we're a small shop start-up. You know, we couldn't be more agile. Yet this whole week we lost putting new features and bringing some great technology to the people because we have to fix IE issues because it can't support the standards that are out there. It's just crazy. Junk. It's a waste of time, it's a waste of money. It's junk. That's where Microsoft should be spending their billions of dollars Yeah, you think? Okay, and then last one, great bring your own device article. I thought it was very well stated. "Technology in itself is not And technology exists to augment and amplify human potential, and I think it's Northwestern University that's actually to give the talk on it? But they use a hundred percent BYOD. Yeah, it's like I just said, but that's true of all of humankind's tools. They have always been just to amplify their ability. A spear is just an easier way to kill a deer, because killing deer with your bare hands, especially if it's a big deer. Oh, dear. It's a sport. Do you have any news? We've talked about most of my news, but I got a graph of the week I would like to share. Oh, go ahead. This isn't a gripe that I really experience anymore. Now is the time to bring it up. Dotted line reporting. What does that mean? Dotted line reporting. You know, like, "Oh, this person is in IT, but they don't really report directly from me. They work for the local manager. They're a dotted line to me. Why are they a dotted line? Be no line. Yeah. Thank you, Barron. I met a major client right now where we have to decide assignment groups for an ITSM initiative. It is like pulling teeth. I am in hell over it. and you know, we've come to the point now where it's just like are you an incident group? Change group? Request group? Awesome. Fantastic. groups, let's just go with that. Because their organizational structure is so poor, and it changes so often like why do you not understand your business Well enough to organize yourself. They're trying to put themselves functionally and kind of process titles. It kills me, we've got process. title. And we can give process groups no problem, but they fight it to death. Yeah, it blows my mind, you know, where You see these decisions people make from an org-chart standpoint, and I just say to myself, who actually looked at this and said, oh, that's a good idea; let's do that. I think a large amount of this company's specific problems is that there's so much upper that like most people are middle heavy right? Middle management is like this. This company is top heavy instead of middle heavy. It's like directors, VPs, Senior VPs. These are the only people doing work there. It's gotta be either a bank or an insurance company. No comment. No comment. So somebody check Matt Beran on Foursquare. I don't check-in anywhere. I don't. I stopped using Foursquare. So, a client I used to work at -- they actually had someone who was the "problem manager," and I know there's a lot of people in that role. My boss is the problem manager. Yeah, yeah, yeah. I know a lot of problem managers. But the reality, it's like why do people not get the idea of a role? You know, did they never play cops and robbers as a kid? Put on a couple extra pounds. I mean, you get rolls for days. I don't know, the whole thing just seems silly to me. Every time my partner works for a very large financial organization. And he's in development. Been there for twenty years. And it's funny because he'll come home, he'll be on call, he'll get calls about production blows up and I'll listen in. Before he even will help someone, did you create a ticket? So he's a developer, he won't even talk to them until I created the ticket. But, they say 'yes', he then hangs up the phone, remote dials in to make sure the ticket's there and then starts to help. Finally! You know, I said to him the other week. I go, I just want you to know that you're the reason people hate IT. He goes, well why do you even care? and I said, do you know what I do for a living, and he goes, seriously so we sat down after 17 years of being together and we talked about what we each did and it It turns out I am living with the enemy! That is awesome. It's like Stockholm Syndrome, I just don't know what to do. Do I kiss him do I get him fired? i just don't know. You should just set to your bi-line: Living with the enemy. Living with the enemy. Tech fluffer. Alright and then I guess the last thing for me, I've got an announcement. I hope we don't have too many people streaming so word doesn't get out too fast. But, you're leaving service now. Please, I've been. He needs to make money. Yeah, come on. No, so, I've had an idea for some time and we've been very successful with these Google Hangouts. And I've kind of put some things into motion that I'll be announcing next week after the STI conference, officially. But I've secured one time.and I'm working on the other two. But coming December 1st, we will actually be streaming a 'un-conference' for IT Service Management Professionals starting in Auckland, New Zealand going time zone by time zone, following the sun over a Google hangout continuously for 24 hours with the support of Google themselves. Awesome. That's fantastic. How are you going to stay awake? I'm not doing it. I'm not doing it. I'm not doing it. I'm doing it. That needs to be on the soundboard. No, no no. You'll have all the details next week. but there are 24 available slots. We're looking for 8 people in the Oceania- It's like and ITS-amathon. Yep, we're looking for 8 people in Oceania, 8 people in Europe, 8 people in North America to handle 24 hours of programming. We'll be looking for 48 people altogether so each person has a back up every hour on the hour following the sun we will start and bring out a new speaker all streamed live. No registration and available afterwards on YouTube Can I man the phone banks? This is not a telethon. I just want to be sitting in the back. And then we can only get this release approved if you call now your next speaker is waiting in the wings and we need one more pledge. You get this stuffed Hooper doll at the 250 dollar level. You get this Matt Barron bottle of Ritalin at the $500 level. Ritalin's not that expensive. A bouncy ball. Bouncy ball. So yeah, I'm very excited Hopefully, we can get the things worked out with the folk server in the UK next week. But, it just dawned on me, I've been working on it for a while and it finally came to ahead last week because there were folks in South Africa tweeting and conversing with the folks having a conference in New Zealand. And I said to myself, Can we devote Can we just dissolve this whole chapter mentality and just have a conference, a global conference? And someone sent me an email said, 'Well, we can't do that because you can't fly everybody everywhere.' And I'm, like, 'No, we'll just do one.' Well, then you can't do that, because you know, time zone.' I'm like, 'OK, we'll just keep it going.' So I made some contacts and got a hold of someone at Google and contacted someone over in Australia, and looks like we are good to go for December 1st. So watch this space if you want to be a speaker. We're looking for, you know, creme de la creme, top of the top. And the good thing about being or submitting to be a speaker when we do go live, is the speaking slots will be crowdsourced by Listly. So the top 24 people who get voted up on Listly get the spots. Okay. So you know you just violated every rule of a un-conference, right? How so? You're not supposed to determine the topics before you get to the conference. The whole thing is supposed to happen by the people present and, yeah. And obviously that would be the best scenario, but we're dealing with a very volatile technology. Nothing's ever been streamed continuously via a Google hangout 24 hours. So we're actually breaking a world record but I was gonna wait to announce that 'til next week. Thanks for ruining it, Hooper. Well you know what, why don't we just stay on right now. I'm gonna need a few more of these. Oh man. And I'm two hours ahead of you. You guys are nuts. Actually, we just broke a world record. We actually talked about ITSM for almost one solid hour.\ It took 91 episodes. I know women who go through labor quicker than it took us to get to ITSM topics. You notice, it's so hard though, when, it was easier for me to do this when I wasn't consulting but after spending all week automating an HR onboarding process. The last thing I want to do right now is talk about ITSM. You mean when you weren't working before it was easier to talk about work? Yeah, well Yes, thanks to wife, I actually do work at Smack, even though I just don't get paid is the difference. Money's overrated. I think that's good, I think we've got all of our topics. For those of you who've been watching, or been a part of the show for a long time, we switched from Google Docs to Evernote, so now we just share an Evernote folder, and as we see things, we email it into the Evernote folder and share it with each other. With that, we will catch everyone in two weeks, Episode 92, and let's try to get Mr. Kim on. I know we've got a commitment from Hank Marquis. Gene's in. Actually I talked to him, he's in. He had his deadline for his book this week so he was a no go for this week, but definitely looking forward to being on the show with us. All right, we'll get Gene Kim on. I want to give a shout-out to somebody else, too, if I could. Okay, it's prom season, go ahead. All right, thank you. If it's all right. No, it's your show. Okay. Well, I'll share it with you. I just want to make sure you're okay with it. Hold on, hold on Yeah. Right OK. We didn't have an ITSMF for New England there was a no show from one of the speakers. Robert Straud didn't show up. I'm not exactly sure what the details were. He was busy cross-posting his latest video to 18 sources. Cross-posting and his time traveling Stargate thing was broken. When I think of something. So Carlos Casanova who we've talked about but yet to have on the show. Carlos Casanova, he's been on the show. When? Well, maybe he hasn't. It was good to see, it gave me a lot of respect for Carlos and also gave me a lot of respect for the local folks her in the ITSM group in New England even though I'm not a member anymore. I have a lot of respect for them and for what they continue to do. I know there is a lot of other folks in their chapters in their local chapters and people who listen to this show. are dedicating a lot of their own personal time to that. And so I just wanted to say thank you. You know, thank you to all of you if you're volunteering and for all the work that everybody does to kind of keep this stuff alive it takes a lot. And you know, when you see it in action, it really is appreciated. Because it's just so easy to go to a conference and sit back and do nothing. And so thank you from the bottom of my heart. Thank you, Matt Hooper that was beautiful. God I can see Carlos just loving that. He is a good dude. He is a nice guy Robby, give him a ring and see if he wants to come on without Gene Kim at the same time. They probably won't wanna do the Hangout, which will be sad. So, yeah, so thank you, Carlos. Yeah, there are a lot of volunteers. I just resigned from the ITSMF Podcast, the USA podcast. So, they actually got Edie Vedell from HDI now in doing that. So, volunteering is tough work. I mean that takes a lot of. I know spent hours for preparing for this show. Dude, Blondie here shows up in a t-shirt with a beer. Put on a sport coat then suddenly becomes Alright, this has been ITSM Weekly, the Podcast episode 91 for the week ending June 28th. We'll see you all next week. Thanks. Bye everybody. Adios. Bye. This was ITSM Weekly, thank you for listening. For more information about this podcast and ITSM news, go to ITSMWeekly.com. ITSM Weekly, the podcast bringing you news, insight, analysis, and information from the world of IT service management. Your hosts, Matthew Hooper, Chris Anthony, and Matt Baron. IT service managment weekly, the podcast starts now. Welcome to ITSM Weekly the podcast, episode 91 for the week ending, we'll make it June 20th, because we're always a little bit in the future. Something like that. How are you guys doing? Excellent. Fantastic. I'm Chris Hansen with Dateline NBC. Those are the 5 words I never want to hear. Past 5 days have flown by for a clean June 20th. Yes, well said. We're going to go ahead and record today we have a very special guest on. That special guest is my invisible friend. No. Let's get going right with some news Darren, do you have anything for us? Tons. We should mention Top of the World premier. Another podcast. You can listen to Aleruses' real voice, if you so choose. I thought Debilling did a pretty good job owning that. We'll see where that goes. It's kind of fun to listen to the Swedish accent or the Norwegian accent because I get a lot that around here in Minnesota. Yes, I thought it was a very good show. I thought Ross did a nice music is custom for ITSM Weekly Top of the World edition. And somebody even made fun saying it reminded them of that old song "I'm on top of the world looking down on creation." Oh well. Yeah, it was a good show. I do not know Hooper, you haven't had a chance to listen to it. You're still recovering from the drama that was, I don't know, the situation with math challenge. In your new office that's kind of nice. I'm in my new office, yes. So, tell us a little bit about this office you're in now. It's in Kabul, that's why in a tent. You're in Kabul. No, my new office is my back yard. Beautiful here. That's nice. What a beautiful day it is. As a kid did you ever camp in the back. Oh, wow. That was really nice. Maybe we should do a podcast completely outside once. We should. I'm down. Yeah. I'll go out right now. Yeah, we used to do that as kids I grew up more in the city. So camping for me wasn't as much of an experience as it would be for my kids camping in this backyard. Every time I camped as a kid, it always turned out awkward for everyone. Yeah. I'm sure. Every time I've podcasted as an adult, it turned out awkward for everyone. That's right. I would always hear, ...to wrestle you so freakin' bad. I want to wrestle you so freakin' bad. It was just one of those things as a child it just never worked out well for anyone. Yes. It's kind of like teaching ITIL. Speaking of teaching ITIL, did you see [Hay Marquois] is looking for ITIL trainers? No, I didn't. I missed that. Where is, where did he land right now? he's back at global knowledge we talked about it last week, but I wouldn't want you to pay attention while you're recording. Not while you're recording, before and only before. Yeah, what's funny if you read that tweet in England, it means he's looking for altoid sneakers, which is awkward for everyone as well. Trainers? Yeah, trainers. What do they call them in the UK, teachers? No, they call sneakers trainers I thought. Or maybe they call sweatpants trainers. I would think that they'd call trainers sneakers. Terrible. OK, so other news: Evernote to release activity stream today. I saw that, but it looked like it was just for windows. Oh, really I did not see if it does. 'Cause it's not on mine. I saw you tweet that you were excited about it. I thought, It's just on the Windows client. What are you, backsliding? Another reason that I have to install VM again. Or another reason just to actually pay attention to what you actually click on and read. Come on, Chris. Don't give me that. If it's on PC, it's coming on Mac. I think it's a great idea. I think everything should have an activity and if you disagree with me, I know you're lying. Dude, I'm still overwhelmed with what you like something from Miami Vice Circa '91. We got like Crockett and Tubbs. Is that truly a sports jacket, I should have put a sports jacket on. No. If I'd got the memo I would have. You've got a little bit of man. If actually had the time to read the show notes before we recorded I would have. Yeah. I won't give you a hard time, I know you're still recovering. So I guess other pseudo-industry news, so Facebook wanted to become relevant, so they spent a billion dollars on Instagram. Microsoft wants to be relevant, so they spend a billion dollars on Yammer. Whoa . I hope it gets more enterprises using Yammer, because it's a part that is infused in a lot of enterprises. You know it would be funny. I wish that Microsoft would take that billion dollars and actually fix their whole life platform which was already a social network, and they could have actually used it to integrate better with Groove, right? So maybe if they just stopped blowing money on other companies and just fixed their own stuff, that would be a little helpful. I remember Groove. I really liked Groove. Groove's great. It was a way that I could have document on my machine but it was also on your machine, It was like Drop Box before Drop Box. That's right, yeah. Groove's a phenomenal technology. Microsoft has picked up so much phenomenal technology and they just destroy it. It sounds familiar! Talking about BMC. So I thought it was really interesting I got an email from ITSMF Fusion. I think you wanna get forward in, and actually we could, to examine why actually that's Edgar Allan Poe. No different. But to figure out why they changed their hashtag from Fusion 12 to SM Fusion or whatever that name it is. But the thing I found most interesting about the ITSMF Fusion, if you're going to that event, here in North America down at the Gaylord Texan, again two words you never together. The platinum sponsor, there's only one platinum sponsor for ITSMF Fusion Guess what mega company is the platinum sponsor? I may know who it is. Who is it? Merryville Technologies. So Merryville Technologies Technology is the platinum sponsor. Guess who the next level down, gold sponsors. Service Now. Isn't IBM one of them? Yep. Serena Software? Nope. will kill this game. Skull sponsors Axios, IBM, and Main Engine, Axios by the way just released... I said IBM Yes, I know you did. What? He said yes to that. there, you happy? Remember, I'm another generation. I need to be affirmed every 30 seconds. That's what Mrs. Barron says. And then some response was you've got no consulting portal, our friend Mainville, people start x-ing Bronze sponsors, service now, what i thought was real interesting thing about that was all the, you know, companies you considered bigger have settled down to the bottom, and then, you know, the mix is there, which kind of makes me wonder We see a lot of the big players missing from shows CA? I don't even think CA's on the list. No they're not. Maybe companies just get so big that they don't they don't need that type of exposure any more at these conferences. Why do you think this looks so backward to me? Well, I know IBM pulled out a few years ago of the show because they had their owned show going on at the same time. Pulse Yeah, Pulse. What was that, eight, nine, ten? They all blur together, I can't remember. Did you say Vicki I said they all blend in together. Who's Vicki Vale? Yeah, so check that out I thought that was prett

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    Participantes: https://twitter.com/mobilon https://twitter.com/paulohiga https://twitter.com/ealecrim A Deep Web é vista como um terreno obscuro e cheio de coisas do mal por muita gente. Isso porque ela só ganha mídia quando o tema são os absurdos que você encontra por lá, como drogas, pornografia infantil e assassinatos por encomenda. Mas nem só de coisas podres vive a deep web. Hoje vamos conversar sobre pra que serve essa rede e debater um pouco sobre como ela é utilizada. Dá o play e vem com a gente!

  • #1 How Not to Pitch a Billionaire
    StartUp Podcast
    27:58
    Podcast
    0

    This is a series about what happens when someone who knows nothing about business starts one. It's called StartUp. In episode one, Alex Blumberg botches his pitch to Silicon Valley billionaire Chris Sacca.

  • deadmau5 - Glish
    The Vergecast
    02:11
    deadmau5
    170,263

    This is a special track made by deadmau5. © 2015 mau5trap Recordings Ltd.

  • Your connected speaker hears everything!
    USA TODAY Talking Tech
    04:50
    Technology
    94,191

    We know that Big Brother is always watching us--but how do we feel about our kitchen speaker listening to all our conversations? Jefferson Graham and the #TalkingTech panel take on the ramifications of the connected speaker from Amazon, Google and soon, reportedly Apple.

  • AntiCast 150 – ~Dossiê~ do Olavão
    AntiCast
    02:56:56
    Teoria
    0

    Olá, antidesigners e brainstormers! Neste programa comemorativo, com quase 3 horas de duração, Ivan Mizanzuk, Rafael Ancara e Zamiliano (o comunista mais maneiro da Interwebz) cumprem a promessa e apresentam o ~Dossiê~ Olavo de Carvalho! Conheça suas pérolas, sua biografia, seu instituto, suas ideias… ah, ouve aí. Desculpa qualquer coisa, obrigado pelos peixes e busquem conhecimento! >> 0h12min10seg Pauta principal >> 2h04min00seg Leitura de comentários >> 2h33min25seg Qual é boa? (plagiando de novo os chefes, até que eles percebam e nos mandem parar. Por enquanto, viva a anarquia!) >> 2h54min28seg Música de encerramento: “Bleeding Mascara”, da banda Atreyu Links Livro André Stolarski – “Fale Mais Sobre Isso” http://www.imaeditorial.com/motor/?download=andre-stolarski-fale-mais-sobre-isso Matricule-se no novo workshop de História da Arte do Ivan – “Arte e Morte: o Morrer como Experiência Estética”, dia 15 de Novembro em São Paulo https://eventioz.com.br/workshopartemortesp1511 Workshop “Pensar Infográfico”, do Ancara e do Fabiano, em São Paulo, dia 19 de Outubro https://eventioz.com.br/e/pensar-infografico-sao-paulo Em Curitiba também, dia 08 de Novembro https://eventioz.com.br/e/pensar-infografico-curitiba--2 Curso “Filosofia do Design”, no Rio de Janeiro, com Daniel Portugal. Início dia 22 de Outubro. http://filosofiadodesign.com/cursos/

  • Cha-Ching!
    Etsy
    00:01
    32,102

    A little ditty from the guts of our iPhone app

  • Giraffe Humming
    WIRED
    00:12
    Giraffe
    115,912

    Giraffe Humming

  • Comcastic service disconnection (recording starts 10 mins into call)
    ryan.block
    08:14
    6,227,431

    Please note: this conversation starts about 10 minutes in -- by this point my wife and I are both completely flustered by the oppressiveness of the rep. So! Last week my wife called to disconnect our service with Comcast after we switched to another provider (Astound). We were transferred to cancellations (aka "customer retention"). The representative (name redacted) continued aggressively repeating his questions, despite the answers given, to the point where my wife became so visibly upset she handed me the phone. Overhearing the conversation, I knew this would not be very fun. What I did not know is how oppressive this conversation would be. Within just a few minutes the representative had gotten so condescending and unhelpful I felt compelled to record the speakerphone conversation on my other phone. This recording picks up roughly 10 minutes into the call, whereby she and I have already played along and given a myriad of reasons and explanations as to why we are canceling (which is why I simply stopped answering the rep's repeated question -- it was clear the only sufficient answer was "Okay, please don't disconnect our service after all."). Please forgive the echoing and ratcheting sound, I was screwing together some speaker wires in an empty living room! Updates: 7/15 - Comcast has issued an apology: http://corporate.comcast.com/comcast-voices/comcast-statement-regarding-customer-service-call 7/16 - I have continued to reiterate publicly that I do not want Comcast to terminate the rep, and that I believe the call itself belies a deeper, systemic dysfunction: https://twitter.com/ryan/status/489576392250519552 https://twitter.com/ryan/status/489576399636676609 https://twitter.com/ryan/status/489576406301413376

  • Runde 129: Playerunknown’s Battlegrounds
    Auf ein Bier GamesPodcast
    01:42:43
    Gamespodcast
    38,641

    Der Battle-Royale-Mehrspielershooter Playerunknown’s Battlegrounds ist das derzeit meistgespielte Spiel auf Steam. Zehn Millionen Verkäufe binnen eines halben Jahres, täglich über eine Million Spieler zur gleichen Zeit. An PUBG oder Plunkbat, wie der Shooter von seinen Fans genannt wird, kommen wir nicht vorbei. Das Phänomen mussten wir uns einfach ansehen. Und nun sprechen wir drüber und wertschätzen das Spiel. Weil Jochen und Sebastian aber immer noch PUBG-Greenhorns sind, ist mit dem GameStar-Newsautor Stefan Köhler ein Shooter-Profi und PUBG-Veteran zugeschaltet. Wir wünschen viel Spaß beim Zuhören!

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